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Posts Tagged ‘visual argument’

Update: Submission Deadline Extended to 20 April 2015

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: SPECIAL ISSUE ON TWENTY YEARS OF VISUAL ARGUMENT

Argumentation and Advocacy invites submissions for a special anniversary issue on visual argument titled “Twenty Years of Visual Argument.” The issue, scheduled to be published in 2016, will celebrate and extend the groundbreaking work on visual argument that appeared in the journal’s 1996 (double) issue on visual argument. Since that time, visual argument has become a central topic in argumentation theory and been featured in presented papers and published articles that explore case studies and investigate the possibility of a theory of visual argument. The special issue editors invite articles that outline what argumentation scholars can learn from the last twenty years of work. In particular, we are interested in articles that address theoretical considerations, helping frame a coherent theoretical account of visual argument (and possibly other multi-modal forms of argument). We welcome theoretical contributions that illustrate their point with concrete examples of visual argument and their use. We are committed to having the special issue represent the wide range of scholarly traditions that engage visual argument including, but not limited to, informal logic, philosophy, and rhetoric.

Questions about the special issue may be directed to the guest editors:

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VISUAL – MULTIMODAL ARGUMENTATION & RHETORIC: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS

(provisional title)

Editors: Assimakis Tseronis (University of Amsterdam); Charles Forceville (University of Amsterdam)

Taking up on the momentum that has been gathering in the last two decades around the study of multimodal discourse from an argumentation studies perspective, we have taken the initiative to propose the first edited volume on the subject to the Argumentation in Context book series of John Benjamins Publishing House. The number of papers presented in the last OSSA and ISSA conferences as well as the special issues devoted to the subject by journals such as Argumentation and Advocacy, Argumentation, and Semiotica attest the growing interest and maturing discussions on the theoretical, methodological and analytical issues that the argumentative analysis of non-verbal modes raises. We would like to invite you to submit a proposal for a chapter that fits with the project as described in the outline of the book.

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26-31 July 2015,
Antwerp, Belgium

CALL FOR PANEL CONTRIBUTIONS

Pragmatic insights for analysing multimodal argumentative discourse

Panel organizers:

Assimakis Tseronis, University of Amsterdam
Chiara Pollaroli, Università della Svizzera italiana
Charles Forceville, University of Amsterdam

Theme

In the last two decades or so, scholars from discourse analysis, cognitive linguistics, as well as pragmatics and argumentation studies have started paying attention to the non-verbal modes that interact with the verbal in a variety of media and communicative genres. Within multimodal discourse analysis, each mode is studied as realising part of the information communicated and their interaction as contributing to meaning-making processes. In most of the studies within multimodal analysis, however, the focus is more on the image-internal aspects than on the interaction between the image and the viewer and the properties of the context that play a role in the interpretation process.

Cognitive approaches to visual communication, by contrast, have focused on the interpretation (more…)

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Do PIPA and SOPA threaten to reverse legal burden of proof in the US?  Clay Shirky argues they do.  I don’t know enough about the legal system, or the proposed legislation.  However, this is a serious allegation with implications far beyond the US.

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Some readers of RAIL may already with John Bohannon’s brilliant competition Dance your PhD.  In the video below, given at a TED event in Brussels, Bohannon generalizes the point that Dance your PhD essentially makes: Explanations can be effectively delivered in any number of ways.  Though the suggestion that dancers might replace the ubiquitous and dreaded PowerPoint is a bit tongue-in-cheek to be sure, I think that the observations Bohannon makes here about it’s pitfalls are spot on and worthy of consideration.

I have to admit that I’m also seized with curiosity as to how or even whether this could be done with arguments.  At the very least the results would put a whole new “spin” on Michael Gilbert‘s theory of visceral argument. 🙂

Enjoy.

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