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Archive for the ‘Logic’ Category

Tonight marked a very special occasion for the entire argumentation theory community: the inaugural lecture opening the Argumentation Studies Ph.D. program at the University of Windsor.

To be clear the program’s first class of students began classes at the start of this term, so tonight’s event was more ceremonial than operational, but it was a great event. It was an honor to be there. The lecture was given by guest of honor Frans van Eemeren, and covered the history, recent trends in and future prospects of the pragma-dialectic school of argumentation theory. It was a lovely talk and Professor van Eemeren closed it with words of encouragement for the first class of Argumentation Studies Ph.D. students:

“The future is yours.”

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Philosophy of Argumentation – An Issue of Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric

We invite the submission of papers to an issue of the journal Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric (https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/slgr) entitled ‘The Philosophy of Argumentation’. This issue is designed to build on the impact of recent events in argumentation and linguistics in Poland and aims to bring together researchers with a variety of perspectives and backgrounds in a discussion of the philosophical aspects of argumentation theory, and to further enhance the growing reputation of Poland as a centre for study in the field.

The journal issue will be co-edited by Martin Hinton (University of Łódź) and Marcin Koszowy (University of Białystok and Polish Academy of Science).

Topics

A philosophical approach to argument and persuasion may touch on many areas and this list is not designed to be exhaustive, but contributions might discuss:

(more…)

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Submission is now open for a special issue of Synthese on epistemic justification.

Epistemic justification is a crucial concept in epistemology, connected to practically all debates within the field. Traditionally it is that which has to be added to true belief in order to yield knowledge, but in recent times the concept has been related to such notions as rational belief change and evidential support, epistemic luck, epistemic virtue and normalcy. The goal of the special issue is to collect new ideas on the subject within different research traditions in analytic epistemology, in particular those which connect the formal and informal approaches.

Papers can be submitted online via the Synthese editorial manager:

https://www.editorialmanager.com/synt/default.aspx

Please make sure to choose “S.I.: Epistemic Justification” as article type.

The deadline for submissions is May 31, 2016.

Eds.: Benjamin Bewersdorf and Jeanne Peijnenburg

Faculty of Philosophy
University of Groningen
The Netherlands

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Source: CFP: Special issue of Philosophy and Technology on “Logic as Technology” | Society for the Philosophy of Information

This special issue initiates Philosophy and Technology’s new subject area on logic and technology by proposing to explore novel insights from the natural, yet in philosophical contexts still uncommon juxtaposition of logic and technology. Instead of considering questions regarding the philosophical relevance of how logic is applied in technology (as witnessed by the role of recursion theory, the foundation of computation, in logic), as a means to reason about technology (reasoning about programs, security, etc.), or even how technology is used to learn more about logic (e.g. with the help of theorem-provers), we suggest to explore how our thinking about logic can be shaped by our thinking about technology. This includes, first and foremost, the suggestion that we can see logic as a technology by avoiding the common restriction of technology to physical artefacts and the even more traditional restriction of logic to symbolically formulated deductive systems. Abstract or semantic artefacts are technologies, and logic is—like mathematics—a typical example of such a technology.

The proposal to see logic as a technology emphasises the mutual interaction between technology and philosophy, but also addresses the deeper issue that the traditional scope of the philosophy of logic does not include influential uses and applications of logic in or related to computer science, economics, cognitive science, or linguistics, as central or essential uses of logic. Indeed, the exclusive focus on logic as a universally applicable standard for correct deductive reasoning, and the common suggestion that reasoning in the vernacular is the notional domain of application for deductive logic, blocks the development of a common understanding of logics as codifications of validity and of logics as formal modelling tools.

The deadline for submissions is 1 May 2016.

Please see the journal website for more information.

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Via loriweb.org:

The 4th International Conference on Tools for Teaching Logic

9-12 June 2015, Rennes, France

TOPICS: Tools for Teaching Logic seeks for original papers with a clear significance in the following topics (but are not limited to): teaching logic in sciences and humanities; teaching logic at different levels of instruction (secondary education, university level, and postgraduate); didactic software; facing some difficulties concerning what to teach; international postgraduate programs; resources and challenges for e­Learning Logic; teaching Argumentation Theory, Critical Thinking and Informal Logic; teaching specific topics, such as Modal Logic, Algebraic Logic, Knowledge Representation, Model Theory, Philosophy of Logic, and others; dissemination of logic courseware and logic textbooks; teaching Logic Thinking

For more information see the conference website: http://ttl2015.irisa.fr/

TTL 2015.

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The deadline for submitting contributed papers is May 3, 2015. All other information, including other important dates and practical information, can be found at the colloquium website:

Logic Colloquium 2015

LC 2015 is also the European summer meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic (ASL)

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Call for Proposals

Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation (OSSA)

Argumentation, Objectivity and Bias

May 18-21, 2016 University of Windsor

The OSSA Organizing Committee invites proposals for papers and posters which deal with argumentation, as it intersects with the ideal of objectivity and the problem of bias.

Abstracts prepared for anonymous refereeing must be submitted electronically no later than SEPTEMBER 7, 2015. Instructions on how to prepare and where to submit abstracts will be made available in March on the OSSA 11 website: www.uwindsor.ca/ossa .

Keynote speakers:

  • Mark Battersby, Critical Inquiry Group Vancouver
  • Scott Jacobs, Department of Communication University of Illinois, Urbana
  • Michel Meyer, Chaire de Rhétorique et d’Argumentation, Université Libre de Bruxelless
  • Susana Nuccetelli, Department of Philosophy St. Cloud State University

The J. Anthony Blair Prize

OSSA wishes to promote the work of graduate students and young scholars in the field of argumentation studies. Thus we strongly encourage submissions from this group. The J. Anthony Blair Prize ($1000 CDN) is awarded to the student paper presented at the Conference judged to be especially worthy of recognition. The competition is open to all students whose proposals are accepted for the Conference. Canadian graduate students who need financial assistance in order to attend should advise the Organizing Committee when they submit their proposals. For the purpose of the Conference, a graduate student is one who has not completed his or her graduate program by September 7, 2015. (Additional information about this prize will also be available on the website.) All conference related inquiries should be sent to ossa@uwindsor.ca

Organizing Committee:


H. V. Hansen – C. E. Hundleby – C. W. Tindale
University of Windsor

www.uwindsor.ca/ossa

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