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Archive for the ‘Informal Logic’ Category

Naturally I believe every issue of Informal Logic should be read cover to cover, but the most recent issue is particularly timely and deserves special mention here. Informal Logic Vol 38, No 1 (2018): Special Issue: Reason and Rhetoric in the Time of Alternative Facts is everything it’s title promises. Hats off to special editors Katharina Stevens and Michael Baumtrog for giving us the perfect antidote to the narcotic of fake news: a collection of articles that demystify and respond to it with clear, careful and informed thought.  It’s got Trump. It’s got snakes. It’s got everything you need to get started with your Defense Against the Dark Arts homework. Do check it out!

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“Decoys” by V.H. Hatter, CC SA-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons. No endorsement implied.

The Phenomenon

The “fake news” phenomenon plays on highly predictable and prevalent weaknesses in human cognition: confirmation bias, ownership/endowment effects, and belief overkill using messages with high affective valence, usually negative. Emotions of fear, outrage, and suspicion typically are featured, but sometimes positive themes are used too, like appeals to feelings of patriotism or nostalgia for an idealized past. The images selected typically reflect whatever the emotional focus is, or whoever (or whatever, in the case of abstract institutions) is the target of that focus. There is no attempt at truthful communication. Sources are often described rather than named (think pizzagate’s “New York City police detective”, or phrases like “sources close to the Trump family”). Essentially, fake news stories follow the same sort of style as tabloid writing: sensationalistic, unverifiable, and over-the-top claims are made about publicly recognizable figures for money. That’s nothing new. Tabloid journalism has been around since papers started being printed. What’s “new” about fake news is that: (more…)

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Tonight marked a very special occasion for the entire argumentation theory community: the inaugural lecture opening the Argumentation Studies Ph.D. program at the University of Windsor.

To be clear the program’s first class of students began classes at the start of this term, so tonight’s event was more ceremonial than operational, but it was a great event. It was an honor to be there. The lecture was given by guest of honor Frans van Eemeren, and covered the history, recent trends in and future prospects of the pragma-dialectic school of argumentation theory. It was a lovely talk and Professor van Eemeren closed it with words of encouragement for the first class of Argumentation Studies Ph.D. students:

“The future is yours.”

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Philosophy of Argumentation – An Issue of Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric

We invite the submission of papers to an issue of the journal Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric (https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/slgr) entitled ‘The Philosophy of Argumentation’. This issue is designed to build on the impact of recent events in argumentation and linguistics in Poland and aims to bring together researchers with a variety of perspectives and backgrounds in a discussion of the philosophical aspects of argumentation theory, and to further enhance the growing reputation of Poland as a centre for study in the field.

The journal issue will be co-edited by Martin Hinton (University of Łódź) and Marcin Koszowy (University of Białystok and Polish Academy of Science).

Topics

A philosophical approach to argument and persuasion may touch on many areas and this list is not designed to be exhaustive, but contributions might discuss:

(more…)

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Call for Papers

Disagreement: Perspectives from Argumentation Theory and Epistemology: a special issue of Topoi


Submission Deadline: 31 October, 2017

Guest Edited by Patrick Bondy and David Godden

Topoi invites submissions to Disagreement: Perspectives from Argumentation Theory and Epistemology, a special issue edited by Patrick Bondy (Brandon University) and David Godden (Michigan State University).

The subject of this special issue is disagreement and how to rationally respond to it. The issue itself aims to bring together multiple perspectives bearing on the epistemological dimensions of disagreement broadly conceived.

(more…)

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EXTENDED DEADLINE

Please see below for details.

Call for Papers

“Methodologies for Research on Legal Argumentation”

Special Issue of the journal, Informal Logic (ISSN: 0824-2577)
www.argdiap.pl/InformalLogic

“Methodologies for Research on Legal Argumentation” will explore the current state of the art in the study legal argumentation which is characterized by the applicability of a great variety of concepts, distinctions, frameworks and methods. Our aim is to provide a venue for the exchange of ideas from different research perspectives, including AI and Law, argumentation theory, and legal theory.

This volume is the 2nd special issue published under auspices of the ArgDiaP organisation (www.argdiap.pl). The first one, published as an issue of the Argumentation journal (www.argdiap.pl/argumentation), was dedicated to the research of the Polish School of Argumentation. That special issue also included the School’s Manifesto (www.argdiap.pl/manifesto) co-authored by 55 researchers from 20 institutions all across Poland.

The special issue will continue exciting discussions which took place at the 1st MET-ARG workshop (Methodologies for Research on Legal Argumentation www.argdiap.pl/metarg2014) organised in Kraków in 2014 in conjunction with JURIX 2014 (27th International Conference on Legal Knowledge and Information Systems www.conference.jurix.nl/2014/) and CMNA 2014 (14th Workshop on Computational Models of Natural Argument www.cmna.info/CMNA14/).

The topics include, but are not limited to: (more…)

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Informal Logic

Vol 35, No 3 (2015): Reasoning and Argumentation in Theory and Practice
Table of Contents
http://ojs.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/informal_logic/issue/view/435

Articles

The Argument Form “Appeal to Galileo”: A Critical Appreciation of Doury’s
Account
(221-272)
Maurice A Finocchiaro

The Basic Slippery Slope Argument (273-311)
Douglas Walton

Inference, Circularity, and Begging the Question (312-341)
Matthew William Mckeon

A Computational Model of Pragma-dialectics as a Tool for its Analysis and
Evaluation
(342-377)
Alejandro Secades

Analogical Argument Schemes and Complex Argument Structure (378-445)
Andre Juthe

Book Reviews

Argumentation & Health, Rubinelli & Snoeck Henkemans (Eds.) (446-449)
Jane McArthur

In Memoriam

Remembering Richard Paul (500)
Journal Editors

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