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Archive for the ‘Rationality’ Category

Source: CFP: Special issue of Philosophy and Technology on “Logic as Technology” | Society for the Philosophy of Information

This special issue initiates Philosophy and Technology’s new subject area on logic and technology by proposing to explore novel insights from the natural, yet in philosophical contexts still uncommon juxtaposition of logic and technology. Instead of considering questions regarding the philosophical relevance of how logic is applied in technology (as witnessed by the role of recursion theory, the foundation of computation, in logic), as a means to reason about technology (reasoning about programs, security, etc.), or even how technology is used to learn more about logic (e.g. with the help of theorem-provers), we suggest to explore how our thinking about logic can be shaped by our thinking about technology. This includes, first and foremost, the suggestion that we can see logic as a technology by avoiding the common restriction of technology to physical artefacts and the even more traditional restriction of logic to symbolically formulated deductive systems. Abstract or semantic artefacts are technologies, and logic is—like mathematics—a typical example of such a technology.

The proposal to see logic as a technology emphasises the mutual interaction between technology and philosophy, but also addresses the deeper issue that the traditional scope of the philosophy of logic does not include influential uses and applications of logic in or related to computer science, economics, cognitive science, or linguistics, as central or essential uses of logic. Indeed, the exclusive focus on logic as a universally applicable standard for correct deductive reasoning, and the common suggestion that reasoning in the vernacular is the notional domain of application for deductive logic, blocks the development of a common understanding of logics as codifications of validity and of logics as formal modelling tools.

The deadline for submissions is 1 May 2016.

Please see the journal website for more information.

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2nd Call for Papers: Topoi–Reasoning, Argumentation, and Critical Thinking Instruction

Submission Deadline: 30 OCTOBER 2015

Topic: Reasoning, Argumentation, Critical Thinking Instruction (RACT)

Journal: TOPOI (http://www.springer.com/philosophy/journal/11245)

Peer review stage: about 8 weeks

Submission of revised papers: January 2016

Online-first publication expected: April 2016

Following the RACT2015 conference, held 25-27 FEB at Lund University (see: http://ract2015.wordpress.com), we invite submissions of papers for publication in a special issue of TOPOI (http://www.springer.com/philosophy/journal/11245). Papers must be in the order of 6000 to 8000 words (including references), and must address one or more of the conference themes listed at the above website. Whether being addressed from an empirical or a more conceptual perspective, other than rigor and quality of scholarship (as evidenced, for instance, by demonstrating, familiarity with the relevant literature), this special issue primarily seeks to inform those who wish to reduce the distance between the research front and what is (falsely) presented to students as the state-of-the-art critical thinking instruction. Therefore, papers should in one way or another be of immediate relevance to those who already do, or plan to, teach or implement instruction in critical thinking as part of school or university education, either as dedicated courses or across the curriculum. Of special relevance is the current trend to appropriate research on social, cognitive and other biases, as well as two systems or two processes accounts of human reasoning.

Among those invited to submit to this special issue are the RACT keynote speakers: (more…)

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Context 2015 will provide a forum for presenting and discussing high-quality research and applications on context modeling and use. The conference will include paper and poster presentations, system demonstrations, workshops, and a doctoral consortium. The conference invites researchers and practitioners to share insights and cutting-edge results from a wide range of disciplines including:

  • Computer Science
  • Artificial Intelligence and Ubiquitous Computing
  • Cognitive Science
  • Linguistics
  • Organizational Sciences
  • Philosophy
  • Psychology
  • Application areas such as Medicine, Law, Context-Aware Systems, etc.

    The deadline for submissions is June 1, 2015. For more information please visit the conference website: ] CONTEXT [ 2015.

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    Causal and Probabilistic Reasoning

    18-20 June, 2015, Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy

    Idea and Motivation

    2015 marks the 15th anniversary of the publications of Judea Pearl’s Causality and the second edition of Peter Spirtes, Clark Glymour, and Richard Scheines’ Causality, Prediction, and Search, which together are the foundations for the mathematical theory of causal modeling. During this period, the theory of causal Bayesian networks has been applied to a variety of topics in the special sciences, including the brain and cognitive sciences. This conference will focus on the applications of probabilistic and causal modeling in cognitive science, with an emphasis on assessing both the power and limitations of these tools in our understanding of cognition.
    Topics of the conference will include, but are not be limited to:
    • Causal reasoning
    • Probabilistic reasoning
    • Models of bounded rationality
    • Probabilistic causal models in cognitive psychology
    • Models of Judgment and Decision Making
    • Learning and Decision Making
    • Group Decision Making
    • Social Norms and Networks
    • Foundations of Causal Bayesian Networks

    Call for Abstracts

    (more…)

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    Call for Papers

    AREW: Analogical Reasoning East & West
    Heidelberg, Germany, November 24-25, 2014

    AREW is a two-day workshop aimed at bringing together people working in the area of analogical reasoning, broadly speaking. The invited speakers are two people working on formal aspects of analogical reasoning, including issues of the logical representation of analogical reasoning and formal models of the same, and applications of analogical reasoning, particularly with reference to such applications in history. Further information about the workshop can be found at
    https://analogicalreasoning.wordpress.com.

    (more…)

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    23-26 September, 2015
    Diego Portales Univeristy,
    Santiago, Chile

    Conference Website: http://www.cear-lact.udp.cl/index.htm

    About the Conference

    The Fourth International Conference on Argumentation, Psychology of Reasoning and Critical Thinking is a new academic effort of our Centre to continue what was started in January 2008 and continued in October 2010 and January 2013. Just as with the three first Conferences, in which we were together with researchers from Argentina, Chile, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, Paraguay, Spain, The Netherlands, United States, and Uruguay, in this fourth Conference we are not only trying to deepen and update the production of knowledge in the fields that this conference covers, but we are also trying to contribute to a positive valuation of different proposals that develop critical thinking and promote social debate with a standard of reasonableness.

    This Conference, organized by the Centre for the Study of Argumentation and Reasoning (CEAR) of the Faculty of Psychology at Diego Portales University, would like to generate tools, approaches and solutions to apply in those fields in which the uses of reason is fundamental: communication, law, education, etc. We do not have an official theoretical position, but rather we value the diversity of angles and proposals. We invite the scientific international community, which works in the topics of the Conference, to participate and share its knowledge, experience and current challenges.

    (more…)

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    Argumentation, Rationality and Decision

    Imperial College London, 18th-19th September 2014

    Argumentation, initially studied in philosophy and law, has in recent years been the subject of extensive formal research in artificial intelligence and computer science. It provides representations and algorithms for reasoning with incomplete and possibly inconsistent information. Formalisms can be used to model decision-making by individual agents performing critical thinking or by multiple entities dialectically engaged to reach mutually acceptable decisions. However, so far there has been little engagement with the rich mathematical theories of decision, studied as part of microeconomic theory.

    In turn, formal rational choice theory has paid little attention to the structure and content of arguments brought to bear on decisions. The outcomes of choices are typically assigned values treated as embodying a cardinal or ordinal preference relation, with decision rules identifying good choices according to various decision rules and under differing conditions of circumstantial knowledge (certainty, strict uncertainty, risk). However, when people make decisions, whether that process has been rational or not depends not only on the optimality of outcome, but also on the argumentative structure implicit in the person’s deliberation. The structure of argument is important, and arguments for and against choices are weighed against each other depending on how firm the reasons are from which the argument is formed.

    (more…)

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