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1st CALL FOR PAPERS 3rd European Conference on Argumentation – ECA 2019

Reason to Dissent

Monday, June 24 – Thursday, June 27 2019, Groningen, The Netherlands

The European Conference on Argumentation (ECA) is a pan-European biennial initiative aiming to consolidate and advance research on argumentation. After two successful editions, in Lisbon in 2015 and in Fribourg in 2017, ECA will be hosted in 2019 by the University of Groningen, in Groningen, The Netherlands.

We aim to attract scholars on argumentation world-wide from various disciplines, dealing with various themes and adopting various approaches.

More details, including deadlines and proposal submission guidelines can be found in the attached CFP: 1st-CALL-FOR-PAPERS.

For more information see the conference website: ECA | European Conference on Argumentation, join the ECA group on Facebook or email ecargument2019@rug.nl.

Please note that as in previous years there will also be a Summer School in Argumentation prior to the conference!

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The Department of Philosophy, which is one of three departments of the Faculty of Humanities, is a vibrant and international community of philosophers committed to high-quality teaching and research in diverse areas of philosophy. The Theoretical Philosophy group, where the current position is based, was evaluated as the best group in theoretical philosophy among all participating groups during the last QANU research visitation.

The position is part of Dr. Catarina Dutilh Novaes’ ERC Consolidator project ‘The Social Epistemology of Argumentation’, which is devoted to investigating the role(s) of argumentation in social processes of sharing and producing epistemic resources such as knowledge, justification, defeaters etc. This postdoc project focuses specifically on formal theories of argumentation, in different disciplines: argumentation theory, logic, artificial intelligence, game theory, formal social epistemology. The postdoc will survey a number of prominent formal accounts of argumentation in order to determine how best to capture the key idea of the project, namely that argumentation is best conceived of as social epistemic exchange, within a formal framework. The postdoc project will be carried out in collaboration with the principal investigator, Catarina Dutilh Novaes, and PhD students and another postdoc to be appointed at later stages. The position includes ample funding for research and travel. A full description of the ERC project is available upon request; candidates are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the project when writing their letter of application.

Tasks

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Naturally I believe every issue of Informal Logic should be read cover to cover, but the most recent issue is particularly timely and deserves special mention here. Informal Logic Vol 38, No 1 (2018): Special Issue: Reason and Rhetoric in the Time of Alternative Facts is everything it’s title promises. Hats off to special editors Katharina Stevens and Michael Baumtrog for giving us the perfect antidote to the narcotic of fake news: a collection of articles that demystify and respond to it with clear, careful and informed thought.  It’s got Trump. It’s got snakes. It’s got everything you need to get started with your Defense Against the Dark Arts homework. Do check it out!

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Poznań Reasoning Week 2018

Deadline for submissions: 1 JUNE 2018

 

https://poznanreasoningweek.wordpress.com/

Poznań Reasoning Week 2018, which is the third edition of PRW, consists of three conferences, aimed at bringing together experts whose research offers a broad range of perspectives on systematic analyses of reasoning processes and their formal modelling. PRW 2018 is co-organised by the Institute of Psychology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland, and Institute of Philosophy, University of Zielona Góra, Poland.

In 2018 we will address:
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Of possible interest to argumentation theorists…

Applied philosophy examines the questions that are most central and relevant to the ways that we live our lives. Many of these questions are epistemic in nature, since questions about what can be known, understood, and reasonably believed, and questions about how we ought to understand the world around us relate directly to our lives. Applied epistemology marks a natural intersection between epistemology and ethics, both because our epistemic activities and beliefs are important determinants of our actions, and because our epistemic agency itself is a central part of our personhood.

Possible topics include:

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Amsterdam, the Netherlands

July 2, 2018

The recent movement of people from one place to another due to precarious circumstances furnishes a decisive, contemporary subject for inquiry. Arguers assemble and move themselves and things about within cities and across countries via material and immaterial networks. Identities are mixed. Status split. Pro and con arguments work amid situations where the roles of hospitality, exchange, and collaboration mix and meet restrictions, group disconnections, and resistance. What are the stances, schemes, and genre of rescuers, smugglers, camp-life, border life, and residential enclaves? What are the dialogical capacities, apparatus, and ties of migrants, refugees, diasporatic groups, displaced persons, specious document holders, extended visa holders, temporary workers, and students? After what scholars call the mobility turn, the history of movement provides new language to understand the ambit of everyday, informal reasoning, as the new “normal”: exile, exodus, migration, expatriation, place-less-ness, multiple identities, and anonymity often without the option of returning “home.”

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800px-Decoys

“Decoys” by V.H. Hatter, CC SA-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons. No endorsement implied.

The Phenomenon

The “fake news” phenomenon plays on highly predictable and prevalent weaknesses in human cognition: confirmation bias, ownership/endowment effects, and belief overkill using messages with high affective valence, usually negative. Emotions of fear, outrage, and suspicion typically are featured, but sometimes positive themes are used too, like appeals to feelings of patriotism or nostalgia for an idealized past. The images selected typically reflect whatever the emotional focus is, or whoever (or whatever, in the case of abstract institutions) is the target of that focus. There is no attempt at truthful communication. Sources are often described rather than named (think pizzagate’s “New York City police detective”, or phrases like “sources close to the Trump family”). Essentially, fake news stories follow the same sort of style as tabloid writing: sensationalistic, unverifiable, and over-the-top claims are made about publicly recognizable figures for money. That’s nothing new. Tabloid journalism has been around since papers started being printed. What’s “new” about fake news is that: Continue Reading »

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