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Posts Tagged ‘multi-modal arguments’

Update: Submission Deadline Extended to 20 April 2015

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: SPECIAL ISSUE ON TWENTY YEARS OF VISUAL ARGUMENT

Argumentation and Advocacy invites submissions for a special anniversary issue on visual argument titled “Twenty Years of Visual Argument.” The issue, scheduled to be published in 2016, will celebrate and extend the groundbreaking work on visual argument that appeared in the journal’s 1996 (double) issue on visual argument. Since that time, visual argument has become a central topic in argumentation theory and been featured in presented papers and published articles that explore case studies and investigate the possibility of a theory of visual argument. The special issue editors invite articles that outline what argumentation scholars can learn from the last twenty years of work. In particular, we are interested in articles that address theoretical considerations, helping frame a coherent theoretical account of visual argument (and possibly other multi-modal forms of argument). We welcome theoretical contributions that illustrate their point with concrete examples of visual argument and their use. We are committed to having the special issue represent the wide range of scholarly traditions that engage visual argument including, but not limited to, informal logic, philosophy, and rhetoric.

Questions about the special issue may be directed to the guest editors:

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As if a new issue of Cogency wasn’t enough to keep us all engrossed in our reading, there is a new issue of Informal Logic out as well. Hilde van Belle’s, “Less Ado, More Done: Verbal and Visual Antithesis in the Media” offers an excellent a contributions both to the worthy effort to explain the idea of antithesis in Aristotle’s rhetorical framework (per Fahnestock) and to the ongoing discussion about multi-modal arguments. It is well worth the time of anyone interested in either discussion.  Though quite a different paper, “The Dialogical Force of Implicit Premises: Presumptions in Enthymemes”, by Fabrizio Macagno and Giovanni Damele is also a very thorough and fascinating treatment of its topic. Haven’t gotten to the other papers yet, but these two suggest a very strong issue of IL indeed.

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4th Summer Institute On Argumentation:-

Multi‐Modal Arguments: Making sense of images (and other non‐verbal content) in Argument

May 27-31, 2013 

  • Can works of art, films, virtual realities and other kinds of non-verbal content operate as arguments?
  • Why have some objected to this suggestion? What can we learn from their objections?
  • How can the various theoretical perspectives that make up argumentation theory, such as informal logic, rhetoric, dialectics, dialogue theory, and discourse analysis, account for multi-modal arguments?
  • How can we construct a comprehensive theory of argument that makes room for, explains, and allows us to assess, arguments of this sort?

In conjunction with the tenth OSSA (Ontario Society for the Study of Argument) conference, CRRAR will offer a summer institute on multimodal arguments.

One trend in the development of argumentation theory is an  increasingly broad conception of argument which recognizes (among other things) the use of “multi-modal”  elements – images, music, and other non-verbal components – as key components of many arguments. In this course we consider the questions that this raises. (more…)

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4th Summer Institute On Argumentation:-

Multi‐Modal Arguments: Making sense of images (and other non‐verbal content) in Argument

May 22-25, 2013

  • Can works of art, films, virtual realities and other kinds of non-verbal content operate as arguments?
  • Why have some objected to this suggestion? What can we learn from their objections?
  • How can the various theoretical perspectives that make up argumentation theory, such as informal logic, rhetoric, dialectics, dialogue theory, and discourse analysis, account for multi-modal arguments?
  • How can we construct a comprehensive theory of argument that makes room for, explains, and allows us to assess, arguments of this sort?

In conjunction with the tenth OSSA (Ontario Society for the Study of Argument) conference, CRRAR will offer a summer institute on multimodal arguments.

One trend in the development of argumentation theory is an  increasingly broad conception of argument which recognizes (among other things) the use of “multi-modal”  elements – images, music, and other non-verbal components – as key components of many arguments. In this course we consider the questions that this raises.

Lectures and discussion will emphasize the development of perspectives that can be used to analyze, explain and evaluate such arguments, and on the analysis of concrete examples of multi-modal arguments and will consider objections to “visual arguments” and other forms of multi-modal argumentation. (more…)

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