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Posts Tagged ‘Rhetoric’

Rhetoric of Evidence

Epistemic Models and Rhetorical Practice in Science, Education, and Culture

March 12-15, 2014

Conference held at: Curt und Heidemarie Engelhorn Palais

Hauptstraße 120, D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany

How can we convey knowledge in an evident way? Which verbal and visual methods can be used for evident presentation of knowledge? How do modern communication media, such as Powerpoint, influence opportunities to create evidence? Within which tradition does the struggle for evident presentations stand? What significance does evidence have in modern natural sciences, in the arts, and in everyday culture? Not only is evidence of rhetorical interest, it is also an important topic for other disciplines. The scope ranges from the ancient demand to use a vivid language by Aristotle, via the empiricism of Locke and Hume, to the current scientific models and simulations. The striving for clarity and logical evidence shapes the current approach to presentation in the natural sciences and influences business presentations as well as presentation in school or the humanities. Furthemore, evidence serves as a method of communicating information and emotion in mass media. Arts and literature can be understood as a struggle for evidence as well: these disciplines developed new strategies to achieve evidence. Thus, evidence can be seen as a culturally established presentation technique, which proves to be very effective. (more…)

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Call for papers

19th International Philosophy Colloquium Evian:
Disagreement – Désaccord – Uneinigkeit

Evian (Lake Geneva), France
July 7-13, 2013

We invite proposals (maximum length: one page) for presentations, along with a short CV (maximum length: two pages), by March 31, 2013. Please send these documents via e-mail to:
evian@philosophie.fu-berlin.de

Is there disagreement? That is, do we really disagree? From the standpoint of everyday life, the answer seems to be clear. Disagreements among us are legion: about scientific, political, and social questions, about questions of right conduct and religion, about questions concerning subjective preferences and aesthetic taste. From the standpoint of rationality, however, it is not so clear how these disagreements should be assessed. Shouldn’t the forceless force of the better argument carry the day in almost all cases of disagreement? Isn’t it possible in principle to determine which view is the better one among rival views? Aren’t disagreements better seen, therefore, as intermediate stages on the way toward a more comprehensive agreement – at least among all those who conduct themselves rationally? If not, can a disagreement itself be rational, even when two interlocutors share the same epistemic presuppositions and the same relevant information? Is “reasonable disagreement” an enduring feature of our practices and reaches deeper than we generally assume? What is the theoretical and practical relevance of persistent disagreement? Does the latter lead to the acceptance of relativism, skepticism, or pluralism? (more…)

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From the Coalition of Women Scholars in the History of Rhetoric: website:

The Program in Writing and Rhetoric and the Hume Writing Center invite proposals for the Ninth Biennial Feminisms and Rhetorics conference, to be held at Stanford University September 25-28, 2013. Our emphasis this year is on links, the connections between people, between places, between times, between movements. The conference theme—Linked: Rhetorics, Feminisms, and Global Communities—reflects Stanford’s setting in the heart of Silicon Valley, a real as well as virtual space with links to every corner of the globe. We aim for a conference that will be multi-vocal, multi-modal, multi-lingual, and inter-disciplinary, one in which we will work together to articulate the contours of feminist rhetorics. (more…)

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Third Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

May 30 – June 1, 2013; Ames, IA

Submission deadline: January 31, 2013

As science continues to become implicated in personal and collective decision-making, the stakes for communicating science to non-expert audiences intensify. In such an environment, a clear articulation of ethical issues arising from science communication is essential. Unfortunately, such an articulation does not yet exist. The purpose of this symposium is to bring together scholars from across disciplines whose research can contribute toward a theoretical articulation of the ethical issues surrounding the communication of science to non-expert audiences.

For this symposium, we invite work from relevant disciplines including communication, rhetoric, philosophy, science and technology studies, and the sciences themselves, on topics such as:

(more…)

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RHETORIC, BETWEEN THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLITICS

 

International Conference

 

CEHUM, University of Minho

Braga, Portugal 

June 21-22, 2013

 

 Call for papers

As one of the consequences of the lingering process of corrosion of the rationalist assumptions of the Enlightenment project, in the last decades we have witnessed an attempt in different areas of the humanities to revive the central role rhetoric used to have in antiquity. Despite its political origins, however, the contribution of political theory to this important endeavour has only come of late, as more and more theorists have started to expose the rhetorical nature of politics in multiple manners: showing how it can be used to offer more sophisticated accounts of public deliberation, more attentive toward emotive aspects and contexts; or revealing it as an important manifestation of practical reason; or studying its presence in canonical thinkers and critical moments in the history of political thought; or finally, taking it as an inspiring source for a post-foundationalist emancipatory political theory.

This variety of approaches testifies to the pervasiveness of the rhetorical dimensions in the whole realm of politics, from action to theory. The aim of this conference is to bring together scholars coming from disciplines such as political theory, philosophy, history, literature, or communication, to debate the multifaceted significance of rhetoric in politics and to explore new ways to incorporate a ‘rhetorical perspective’ in the study of political thought. Our hope is that this event could offer an important moment to assess and foster the still incipient revival of rhetoric in this area. (more…)

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Call for Papers –

International Conference 2013 – Rhetoric in Europe

Call for Papers
International Conference 2013 – Rhetoric in Europe
9.-13.10.2013 / Universität des Saarlandes / Université du Luxembourg

In autumn 2013, a conference on rhetoric will take place at the University of Saarland and the University Luxemburg. This conference will be international and multidisciplinary. The central theme of the symposium is ‘Rhetoric in Europe’. At the same time, we examine what is European in rhetoric and what is rhetorical in Europe. Because 2013 is an anniversary year in the history of rhetoric, the conference will be held in 2013. Presumably, 387 AC, 2400 years ago, Isocrates founded his school of rhetoric and philosophy.

Since antiquity, rhetoric has reigned as one of the great European traditions in education. Currently, as the importance of media of all kind is growing in daily communication, rhetoric is prevailing as an educational topic. The importance of intercultural communication is growing internationally as well as domestically, economically, and politically. Often political changes (from war, refugees, work migration, economical pressure, etc.) impact the crisis that the education system aggravates, (especially in the primary and secondary area), and this not since PISA. The worlds of work, along with public and everyday life, are altered since political (1989/1990), cultural (1968 and again 1989/90), and economical changes are not initiated, but accelerated by the globalization. Even this raw draft shows that schools, universities and adult education have important tasks and responsibili- ties in the formation of qualified teachers, university professors, and adult educators as well as in the research that is the basis for these formations. Because communication is the central category of the intercultural, medial, interpersonal problem, rhetoric is needed urgently in the mediation of “communication competence”, since media rhetoric, economical rhetoric, intercultural rhetoric, political rhetoric, and forensic rhetoric can advance the sectoral rhetorics at will. (more…)

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Call for Papers, Panels, and Abstracts
18th Biennial NCA/AFA Conference on Argumentation, 2013
The Cliff Lodge at Snowbird, Alta, UT, August 1-4, 2013.

Theme: Disturbing Argument


…as in argument that disturbs, contains disturbing words or images, or is about disturbing topics; as in argument that disturbs relationships of power; as in theories and approaches that disturb traditional approaches to  argument. So, “disturbing” is quite polysemous and polyvalent (if not wholeheartedly equivocal).

All submissions about some aspect of argumentation are welcome and encouraged, but preference will be given to those addressing the conference theme.

Submission Process: Please submit electronic versions of completed papers, panel proposals, or extended abstracts to the Conference Program Planner, Catherine H. Palczewski at the Alta submission website. To access the submission site, go to http://www.altaconference.org and click on the 2013 Conference link.

Deadline for Submissions: Friday, March 1, 2013

Submission Format:  The Alta Conference invites completed papers, panel proposals, and paper abstracts written from any of the methodological approaches to argumentation. A submission’s approach to argumentation may be applied, critical, cross-disciplinary, empirical, interpretive, pedagogical, philosophical, and/or theoretical. We also welcome studies
of arguments in particular domains (e.g., legal, political, interpersonal, scientific, etc.) and forms (e.g., verbal, visual, etc.). (more…)

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