Source: CFP: Special issue of Philosophy and Technology on “Logic as Technology” | Society for the Philosophy of Information

This special issue initiates Philosophy and Technology’s new subject area on logic and technology by proposing to explore novel insights from the natural, yet in philosophical contexts still uncommon juxtaposition of logic and technology. Instead of considering questions regarding the philosophical relevance of how logic is applied in technology (as witnessed by the role of recursion theory, the foundation of computation, in logic), as a means to reason about technology (reasoning about programs, security, etc.), or even how technology is used to learn more about logic (e.g. with the help of theorem-provers), we suggest to explore how our thinking about logic can be shaped by our thinking about technology. This includes, first and foremost, the suggestion that we can see logic as a technology by avoiding the common restriction of technology to physical artefacts and the even more traditional restriction of logic to symbolically formulated deductive systems. Abstract or semantic artefacts are technologies, and logic is—like mathematics—a typical example of such a technology.

The proposal to see logic as a technology emphasises the mutual interaction between technology and philosophy, but also addresses the deeper issue that the traditional scope of the philosophy of logic does not include influential uses and applications of logic in or related to computer science, economics, cognitive science, or linguistics, as central or essential uses of logic. Indeed, the exclusive focus on logic as a universally applicable standard for correct deductive reasoning, and the common suggestion that reasoning in the vernacular is the notional domain of application for deductive logic, blocks the development of a common understanding of logics as codifications of validity and of logics as formal modelling tools.

The deadline for submissions is 1 May 2016.

Please see the journal website for more information.


Please see below for details.

Call for Papers

“Methodologies for Research on Legal Argumentation”

Special Issue of the journal, Informal Logic (ISSN: 0824-2577)

“Methodologies for Research on Legal Argumentation” will explore the current state of the art in the study legal argumentation which is characterized by the applicability of a great variety of concepts, distinctions, frameworks and methods. Our aim is to provide a venue for the exchange of ideas from different research perspectives, including AI and Law, argumentation theory, and legal theory.

This volume is the 2nd special issue published under auspices of the ArgDiaP organisation (www.argdiap.pl). The first one, published as an issue of the Argumentation journal (www.argdiap.pl/argumentation), was dedicated to the research of the Polish School of Argumentation. That special issue also included the School’s Manifesto (www.argdiap.pl/manifesto) co-authored by 55 researchers from 20 institutions all across Poland.

The special issue will continue exciting discussions which took place at the 1st MET-ARG workshop (Methodologies for Research on Legal Argumentation www.argdiap.pl/metarg2014) organised in Kraków in 2014 in conjunction with JURIX 2014 (27th International Conference on Legal Knowledge and Information Systems www.conference.jurix.nl/2014/) and CMNA 2014 (14th Workshop on Computational Models of Natural Argument www.cmna.info/CMNA14/).

The topics include, but are not limited to: Continue Reading »

Hyperlinked titles indicate that the article is currently available on an open access basis.

Table of Contents

“Bolivia’s Strategic Maneuvering on its claims for a fully sovereign access to the sea”, Marjorie Gallardo Castañeda, Centro de Estudios Estratégicos de la Academia de Guerra del Ejército de Chile, Santiago, Chile

“Studying Argumentation Behaviour”, Hans V. Hansen, University of Windsor, Windsor, Canada

“Argumentos e inferencias: teoría de la argumentación y psicología del razonamiento”, Hubert Marraud, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, España

“Argumentative moves in a thought experiment”, Eugen OctavPopa, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Book Reviews

Douglas Walton, Burden of Proof, Presumption and Argumentation Cambridge University Press, 2014, 318 pp., US$ 85.00 (hc) ISBN 978-1-107- 04662-7, US$32.99 (pbk) ISBN 978-1-107-67882-8, US$26.00 (e-bk) ISBN 978- 1-139-95048-0.

Reviewed by David Godden, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, Michigan, United States

Catarina Dutilh Novaes, Formal Languages in Logic: A Philosophical and Cognitive Analysis. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012, 275 pp., $26.99 (pbk), ISBN 978-1-107-46031-7.

Reviewed by David Hitchcock, Department of Philosophy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada

via the Blogora, website of the Rhetoric Society of America (RSA):

After a warm and beautiful summer with a very inspiring conference at the University of Warsaw, most of us are back from holiday and continue to work, think, write, or teach in the realm of rhetoric. In order to keep us all informed and to enable a more vivid exchange among the members, the Board of the Rhetoric Society of Europe (RSE) has decided to launch a regular newsletter. It will contain information on the following issues:

1. News from the society
2. Upcoming events (conferences, summer schools, workshops, etc.)
3. Calls for papers
4. Job posts
5. Important book publications
6. Miscellanous (projects, member inquiries, reviews, etc.).

To get a rich and informative newsletter, we need your help. Please send your news to eusorhet@gmail.com before October 25th, 2015.

View the whole post at the RSA website here: http://rsa.cwrl.utexas.edu/node/7824

announcement via http://www.discourseanalysis.net:

The Centre for Applied Linguistics at Warwick is looking for candidates applying for a position as Professor of Applied Linguistics/English Language & Linguistics at the University of Warwick, Centre for Applied Linguistics, Coventry, UK

Location:       Coventry
Salary: Competitive
Hours:  Full Time
Contract Type:  Permanent
Placed on:      16th October 2015
Closes: 31st December 2015
Job Ref:        1509951

You will be an outstanding academic with significant international experience working in the broad field of applied linguistics, including (but not limited to) Continue Reading »

Postdoctoral Research Assistant in Computational Linguistics

Grade 7 (£30,434 – £37,394)

Fixed Term 36 months

Applications are invited for a research assistant to work on an EPSRC-funded project in computational linguistics and argumentation. The Argument Mining project aims to develop a range of techniques in computational linguistics to exploit theories of argument structure and classical rhetoric in order to automatically identify human reasoning in unconstrained natural language texts. The project involves two commercial partners: one a local tech company, the other, IBM and the Watson team in particular.

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26-28 April 2016
University of Granada, Spain


The nature of presumptions is a topic of special interest within the field of law, not only because legal systems abound with so called presumptions of law, but also because some of these presumptions, such as the presumption of innocence and the different presumptions of validity are supposed to determine the very legitimacy of judicial procedures. Philosophers and argumentation theorists have also paid attention to presumptions and presumptive inferences as devices for reaching conclusions under uncertainty playing a widespread cognitive role in both everyday and scientific reasoning. Authors like Nicholas Rescher (2006), Douglas Walton (2008) and James Freeman (2005) even contend that presumptions are unavoidable points of departure for any inquiry, and consequently, conditions of possibility for achieving justification for our claims and beliefs. For, on the one hand, presumptions would articulate the exemption of providing further reasons for our reasons, which is something necessary if chains of reasoning are to stop at some point. And regarding argumentative exchanges, presumptions would serve to allocate the burden of proof among discussants, determining the path for a correct argumentative discussion to take place. This conference aims at bringing together argumentation theorists, philosophers, logicians and philosophers of law working on the role of presumptions, presumptive inferences in the field of law, in science and in everyday reasoning.

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