Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘blogging’

In this video Clay Shirky discusses how open source programmers channel social media technologies in ways that could, if thoughtfully and creatively adopted, bring about powerful changes in the way that democratic institutions work.  There are a number of features of this talk that should be of interest to argumentation theorists.  Students of pragma-dialectics and others who believe that disagreement is of central theoretical importance to argumentation theory, for instance, will find welcoming Shirky’s assertion that “The more ideas there are in circulation, the more ideas there are for any individual to disagree with. More media always means more arguing.”  Also of interest for those of us interested in the intersection between argumentation theory and democratic theory is Shirky’s account of how the method of distributed version control used by early open source programmers enabled “cooperation without [top-down] coordination”. Perhaps most interesting, though, is Shirky’s description that changes in media bring about cultural changes largely by introducing new modes of argument.

Whether one agrees with everything Shirky says here or not, it is hard to disagree with the fundamental intuition that I think  lies underneath his points:  that argumentation is the core technology of democracy, and that improving democracy means attending, carefully and critically, to the modes in which we argue.

Read Full Post »

The ever-industrious folks at ARG:Dundee (the group behind the popular argument diagramming software Araucaria) have a lovely new tool for keeping track of and participating in argumentation on the “blogosphere”.  They call it “argublogging“. I think it’s an impressive extension of the work they’ve done on the Argument Interchcange Format, or AIF. The video below gives a demonstration of how ArguBlogging works.  If you use argument diagrams in class and discuss the kinds of current events that get discussed on blogs then this program may well be your new best friend. Have a look. Try it out.  Send them feedback.  This is work worth supporting.

Read Full Post »