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Posts Tagged ‘ARGMAS’

2011 Workshop in Computational Models of Natural Argument

The 2011 CMNA workshops will be held concurrently with the 25th AAAI Conference in San Francisco, CA,  August 7-11.

Description

The series of CMNA workshops, since its inception in 2001, has been acting to nurture and provide succor to the ever growing community working in “Argument and Computation”. AI has witnessed a prodigious growth in uses of argumentation throughout many of its subdisciplines: agent system negotiation protocols that demonstrate higher levels of sophistication and robustness; argumentation-based models of evidential relations; groupwork tools that use argument to structure interaction and debate; computer-based learning tools that exploit monological and dialogical argument structures in designing pedagogic environments; decision support systems that build upon argumentation theoretic models of deliberation to better integrate with human reasoning

The CMNA workshop series has seen a notable growth in submissions, and forms a complement to more recent series or events, like the ArgMAS series, begun in 2004, and the nascent COMMA series, which held its first meeting in 2006. CMNA keeps a broader, interdisciplinary emphasis on natural (real) arguments and the computational tools and techniques for modeling, manipulating and exploiting them. (more…)

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Seventh International Workshop on
Argumentation in Multi-Agent Systems (ArgMAS 2010)

Toronto, Canada, May 10, 2010

In Conjunction with AAMAS 2010
Workshop web site:
 http://homepages.inf.ed.ac.uk/irahwan/argmas/argmas10/
ArgMAS series web site:
 http://homepages.inf.ed.ac.uk/irahwan/argmas/

Overview

This workshop will focus on the concepts, theories, methodologies, and applications of computational models of argumentation in building autonomous agents and multi-agent systems. Argumentation can be abstractly defined as the formal interaction of different arguments for and against some conclusion (eg, a proposition, an action intention, a preference, etc.). An agent may use argumentation techniques to perform individual reasoning, in order to resolve conflicting evidence or to decide between conflicting goals.   Multiple agents may also use dialectical argumentation in order to identify and reconcile differences between themselves, through interactions such as negotiation, persuasion, and joint deliberation.
The main goal of this workshop will be to bring together the community of researchers working on argumentation in multi-agent systems.

The workshop has the following technical goals:
1.    To explore the use of argumentation in practical reasoning.
2.    To investigate how argumentation can be used to enable rational interaction between autonomous agents.
3.    To explore the applicability of argumentation for solving a variety of problems in multi-agent systems, such as information exchange, negotiation, team formation, deliberation, etc.
4.    To explore strategic reasoning and behaviour in argumentation-based interaction.
5.    To understand how argumentation relates to other areas of multiagent research, such as game theory, agent communications, and planning.
6.    To present and encourage implemented systems which demonstrate the use of argumentation in multi-agent systems.

The workshop aims at bridging the gap between the vast amount of work on argumentation theory and the practical needs of multi-agent systems research.

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