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Archive for the ‘Argumentation’ Category

Amsterdam, the Netherlands

July 2, 2018

The recent movement of people from one place to another due to precarious circumstances furnishes a decisive, contemporary subject for inquiry. Arguers assemble and move themselves and things about within cities and across countries via material and immaterial networks. Identities are mixed. Status split. Pro and con arguments work amid situations where the roles of hospitality, exchange, and collaboration mix and meet restrictions, group disconnections, and resistance. What are the stances, schemes, and genre of rescuers, smugglers, camp-life, border life, and residential enclaves? What are the dialogical capacities, apparatus, and ties of migrants, refugees, diasporatic groups, displaced persons, specious document holders, extended visa holders, temporary workers, and students? After what scholars call the mobility turn, the history of movement provides new language to understand the ambit of everyday, informal reasoning, as the new “normal”: exile, exodus, migration, expatriation, place-less-ness, multiple identities, and anonymity often without the option of returning “home.”

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“Decoys” by V.H. Hatter, CC SA-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons. No endorsement implied.

The Phenomenon

The “fake news” phenomenon plays on highly predictable and prevalent weaknesses in human cognition: confirmation bias, ownership/endowment effects, and belief overkill using messages with high affective valence, usually negative. Emotions of fear, outrage, and suspicion typically are featured, but sometimes positive themes are used too, like appeals to feelings of patriotism or nostalgia for an idealized past. The images selected typically reflect whatever the emotional focus is, or whoever (or whatever, in the case of abstract institutions) is the target of that focus. There is no attempt at truthful communication. Sources are often described rather than named (think pizzagate’s “New York City police detective”, or phrases like “sources close to the Trump family”). Essentially, fake news stories follow the same sort of style as tabloid writing: sensationalistic, unverifiable, and over-the-top claims are made about publicly recognizable figures for money. That’s nothing new. Tabloid journalism has been around since papers started being printed. What’s “new” about fake news is that:

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Tonight marked a very special occasion for the entire argumentation theory community: the inaugural lecture opening the Argumentation Studies Ph.D. program at the University of Windsor.

To be clear the program’s first class of students began classes at the start of this term, so tonight’s event was more ceremonial than operational, but it was a great event. It was an honor to be there. The lecture was given by guest of honor Frans van Eemeren, and covered the history, recent trends in and future prospects of the pragma-dialectic school of argumentation theory. It was a lovely talk and Professor van Eemeren closed it with words of encouragement for the first class of Argumentation Studies Ph.D. students:

“The future is yours.”

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Via The Non Sequitur, the blog of Scott Akin and John Casey:

School has started again. For some of us academics, this means shifting from reading professional literature to papers written by absolute beginners. Over the years this can wear on you, especially since you’ll encounter the same moves over and over and over. The sheer repetitiveness of it will cause you to ask whether you’re having any effect at all on their work. If you’re smart, you’ll vent about it to your trusted colleagues in the friendly confines of the faculty lounge. They will commiserate with you, and hopefully remind you of your obligations as a teacher. After a scotch or two and some quality time in a chesterfield chair, you’ll return to class refreshed, or maybe a bit buzzed, but nonetheless ready to do whatever it is you do.

Should you lack good mentors or quality whisky, you may be tempted to go online with a post about how stupid the kids are. Before you do this, you need to remind yourself of three critical things…

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Read the rest of this excellent post here.

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Philosophy of Argumentation – An Issue of Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric

We invite the submission of papers to an issue of the journal Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric (https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/slgr) entitled ‘The Philosophy of Argumentation’. This issue is designed to build on the impact of recent events in argumentation and linguistics in Poland and aims to bring together researchers with a variety of perspectives and backgrounds in a discussion of the philosophical aspects of argumentation theory, and to further enhance the growing reputation of Poland as a centre for study in the field.

The journal issue will be co-edited by Martin Hinton (University of Łódź) and Marcin Koszowy (University of Białystok and Polish Academy of Science).

Topics

A philosophical approach to argument and persuasion may touch on many areas and this list is not designed to be exhaustive, but contributions might discuss:

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SECOND CALL FOR PAPERS FOR THE 9th ISSA CONFERENCE ON ARGUMENTATION

 

From July 3 to July 6, 2018, the 9th Conference of the International Society for the Study of Argumentation (ISSA) will be held at the University of Amsterdam. The aim of the conference is to draw together scholars from a variety of disciplines that are working in the field of argumentation theory.

 

The keynote speakers are:

     

  • Marianne Doury (Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Paris)
  • Dale Hample (University of Maryland)
  • David Hitchcock (McMaster University)
  •  

The planning committee of the 9th ISSA Conference invites presentations of original, non-published work on argumentation. Argumentation theorists, (informal) logicians, discourse analysts, communication scholars, rhetoricians, legal scholars, AI scholars, and other scholars involved in the study of argumentation are all encouraged to take part.

 

Important dates

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Call for Papers

Disagreement: Perspectives from Argumentation Theory and Epistemology: a special issue of Topoi


Submission Deadline: 31 October, 2017

Guest Edited by Patrick Bondy and David Godden

Topoi invites submissions to Disagreement: Perspectives from Argumentation Theory and Epistemology, a special issue edited by Patrick Bondy (Brandon University) and David Godden (Michigan State University).

The subject of this special issue is disagreement and how to rationally respond to it. The issue itself aims to bring together multiple perspectives bearing on the epistemological dimensions of disagreement broadly conceived.

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The 5th Tokyo Conference on Argumentation will be held August 6 (Sat) – 8 (Mon), 2016, in Tokyo, Japan. The conference is sponsored by the Japan Debate Association (JDA) and Rikkyo Univeristy, Tokyo, Japan. The conference is designed to encourage exchanges of views on the theory, practice and instruction of argumentation across the disciplines.

The deadline for abstracts is 15 January 2016 For more information please visit the conference website.

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Vacancy for Lecturer/Senior Lecturer/Reader

£34,576 to £55,389 Full Time, Permanent. Closing Date: 27 February 2016

The University of Dundee’s School of Science & Engineering is advertising several permanent posts including one covering the Centre for Argument Technology. We are particularly keen to receive applications from candidates in Computational Linguistics to expand the group’s research in Argument Mining (see argmining2016.arg.tech and arg.tech/am), but welcome applications in all areas of the overlap between argumentation and artificial intelligence. A strong publication profile is essential, and for more senior appointments, so is a track record of funding success.

For further information about the Centre for Argument Technology, please see arg.tech or contact Prof. Chris Reed; for more information about the position, see arg.tech/lecturer.

More information can be found at the ARG-tech website for the opening.

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Hyperlinked titles indicate that the article is currently available on an open access basis.

Table of Contents

“Bolivia’s Strategic Maneuvering on its claims for a fully sovereign access to the sea”, Marjorie Gallardo Castañeda, Centro de Estudios Estratégicos de la Academia de Guerra del Ejército de Chile, Santiago, Chile

“Studying Argumentation Behaviour”, Hans V. Hansen, University of Windsor, Windsor, Canada

“Argumentos e inferencias: teoría de la argumentación y psicología del razonamiento”, Hubert Marraud, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, España

“Argumentative moves in a thought experiment”, Eugen OctavPopa, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Book Reviews

Douglas Walton, Burden of Proof, Presumption and Argumentation Cambridge University Press, 2014, 318 pp., US$ 85.00 (hc) ISBN 978-1-107- 04662-7, US$32.99 (pbk) ISBN 978-1-107-67882-8, US$26.00 (e-bk) ISBN 978- 1-139-95048-0.

Reviewed by David Godden, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, Michigan, United States

Catarina Dutilh Novaes, Formal Languages in Logic: A Philosophical and Cognitive Analysis. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012, 275 pp., $26.99 (pbk), ISBN 978-1-107-46031-7.

Reviewed by David Hitchcock, Department of Philosophy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada

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