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The Canadian Society for the Study of Rhetoric (CSSR / SCÉR) invites members to submit proposals for papers to be presented at its annual conference, to be held in conjunction with the Canadian Federation of Social Sciences and Humanities’ Congress 2016 (http://congress2016.ca) at the University of Calgary, Calgary, AB., May 31 – June 2, 2016.

The deadline for proposals is 10 January 2016. See the conference website for more information.

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Submission is now open for a special issue of Synthese on epistemic justification.

Epistemic justification is a crucial concept in epistemology, connected to practically all debates within the field. Traditionally it is that which has to be added to true belief in order to yield knowledge, but in recent times the concept has been related to such notions as rational belief change and evidential support, epistemic luck, epistemic virtue and normalcy. The goal of the special issue is to collect new ideas on the subject within different research traditions in analytic epistemology, in particular those which connect the formal and informal approaches.

Papers can be submitted online via the Synthese editorial manager:

https://www.editorialmanager.com/synt/default.aspx

Please make sure to choose “S.I.: Epistemic Justification” as article type.

The deadline for submissions is May 31, 2016.

Eds.: Benjamin Bewersdorf and Jeanne Peijnenburg

Faculty of Philosophy
University of Groningen
The Netherlands

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Source: CFP: Special issue of Philosophy and Technology on “Logic as Technology” | Society for the Philosophy of Information

This special issue initiates Philosophy and Technology’s new subject area on logic and technology by proposing to explore novel insights from the natural, yet in philosophical contexts still uncommon juxtaposition of logic and technology. Instead of considering questions regarding the philosophical relevance of how logic is applied in technology (as witnessed by the role of recursion theory, the foundation of computation, in logic), as a means to reason about technology (reasoning about programs, security, etc.), or even how technology is used to learn more about logic (e.g. with the help of theorem-provers), we suggest to explore how our thinking about logic can be shaped by our thinking about technology. This includes, first and foremost, the suggestion that we can see logic as a technology by avoiding the common restriction of technology to physical artefacts and the even more traditional restriction of logic to symbolically formulated deductive systems. Abstract or semantic artefacts are technologies, and logic is—like mathematics—a typical example of such a technology.

The proposal to see logic as a technology emphasises the mutual interaction between technology and philosophy, but also addresses the deeper issue that the traditional scope of the philosophy of logic does not include influential uses and applications of logic in or related to computer science, economics, cognitive science, or linguistics, as central or essential uses of logic. Indeed, the exclusive focus on logic as a universally applicable standard for correct deductive reasoning, and the common suggestion that reasoning in the vernacular is the notional domain of application for deductive logic, blocks the development of a common understanding of logics as codifications of validity and of logics as formal modelling tools.

The deadline for submissions is 1 May 2016.

Please see the journal website for more information.

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Hyperlinked titles indicate that the article is currently available on an open access basis.

Table of Contents

“Bolivia’s Strategic Maneuvering on its claims for a fully sovereign access to the sea”, Marjorie Gallardo Castañeda, Centro de Estudios Estratégicos de la Academia de Guerra del Ejército de Chile, Santiago, Chile

“Studying Argumentation Behaviour”, Hans V. Hansen, University of Windsor, Windsor, Canada

“Argumentos e inferencias: teoría de la argumentación y psicología del razonamiento”, Hubert Marraud, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, España

“Argumentative moves in a thought experiment”, Eugen OctavPopa, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Book Reviews

Douglas Walton, Burden of Proof, Presumption and Argumentation Cambridge University Press, 2014, 318 pp., US$ 85.00 (hc) ISBN 978-1-107- 04662-7, US$32.99 (pbk) ISBN 978-1-107-67882-8, US$26.00 (e-bk) ISBN 978- 1-139-95048-0.

Reviewed by David Godden, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, Michigan, United States

Catarina Dutilh Novaes, Formal Languages in Logic: A Philosophical and Cognitive Analysis. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012, 275 pp., $26.99 (pbk), ISBN 978-1-107-46031-7.

Reviewed by David Hitchcock, Department of Philosophy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada

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PRESUMPTIONS, PRESUMPTIVE INFERENCES AND BURDEN OF PROOF

26-28 April 2016
University of Granada, Spain
 

FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS


The nature of presumptions is a topic of special interest within the field of law, not only because legal systems abound with so called presumptions of law, but also because some of these presumptions, such as the presumption of innocence and the different presumptions of validity are supposed to determine the very legitimacy of judicial procedures. Philosophers and argumentation theorists have also paid attention to presumptions and presumptive inferences as devices for reaching conclusions under uncertainty playing a widespread cognitive role in both everyday and scientific reasoning. Authors like Nicholas Rescher (2006), Douglas Walton (2008) and James Freeman (2005) even contend that presumptions are unavoidable points of departure for any inquiry, and consequently, conditions of possibility for achieving justification for our claims and beliefs. For, on the one hand, presumptions would articulate the exemption of providing further reasons for our reasons, which is something necessary if chains of reasoning are to stop at some point. And regarding argumentative exchanges, presumptions would serve to allocate the burden of proof among discussants, determining the path for a correct argumentative discussion to take place. This conference aims at bringing together argumentation theorists, philosophers, logicians and philosophers of law working on the role of presumptions, presumptive inferences in the field of law, in science and in everyday reasoning.

(more…)

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UPDATE: SECOND CALL FOR PAPERS

The First International Workshop on Argumentation and Logic Programming (ArgLP 2015).

Cork, Ireland, 31 August, 2015
(co-located with ICLP 2015)

Workshop webpage:
https://ddll.inf.tu-dresden.de/web/Sarah_Alice_Gaggl/ArgLP2015

Selected papers will be considered for a special issue of Fundamenta Informaticae (http://www.iospress.nl/journal/fundamenta-informaticae/)

MOTIVATION

Argumentation has been more and more an active research field in areas as Multi-Agent Systems, Knowledge Representation and Reasoning, Artificial Intelligence, Philosophy, Law, etc. From the computational point of view, logic programming has been influencing fundamental roots of argumentation. Indeed, since Dung formalized a family of argumentation inferences in terms of the so called argumentation semantics, he showed that these argumentation semantics have strong roots in logic-based theories.

The relationship between logic programming and argumentation has attracted increased attention in the last years. Studies range from translating one into the other and back, using argumentation to explain logic programming models, and using logic programming systems to implement argumentation-based languages (ASPARTIX, DIAMOND). Influences go both ways and we believe that both fields can benefit from learning about each other.

This year the presentation of the results of the First International Competition on Computational Models of Argumentation (ICCMA) will be done at TAFA 2015 (co-located with IJCAI 2015). Since some of the most widely known argumentation solvers are based on logic programming methodologies, e.g., ASPARTIX, it is expected that new argumentation solvers based on logic programming could appear. In this setting, ArgLP is aiming at catching the attention of the logic programming community to increase the influence of logic programming in the new theoretical and practical developments of argumentation.

TOPICS

Topics of interest include but are not limited to: (more…)

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“Truth and Persuasion”

September 24-26, 2015,
Sassari (Italy)

Call for Papers

The S.I.F.A. (Italian Society for Analytic Philosophy) is pleased to announce its Midterm Conference on Truth and Persuasion.

General Aim

The conference aims to advance our understanding of the relationships between the concepts of truth and persuasion. While the absolute conception of truth has been widely criticised, the philosophical implications of this critique are far from clear. There is a general agreement that we need a conception of truth sensitive to contexts and to historically situated subjects. Some have concluded that truth is local and rational argumentation culturally bounded. Others have suggested that sound argumentation is culturally relative. What is the role of truth and rational argumentation in the exchange among different cultures? Are conversations among cultures based on persuasion, rather than truth? The Conference aims to refocus the discussion on the intricacies and
complexities of the relation between truth and persuasion, a theme that has been largely neglected in the last decades.

Keynote Speakers

The Keynote speakers will include:

Simon Blackburn
Marian David
Wolfgang Huemer
Frans van Eemeren
(more…)

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