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Posts Tagged ‘argument theory of reasoning’

EXTENDED CALL

“Reasons and Deliberation in Real-World Contexts”

DATES: JUNE 17TH-18TH 2013

The Instituto de Filosofia da Linguagem (Institute for the Philosophy of Language) at FCSH-Universidade Nova de Lisboa (New University of Lisbon) is proud to announce its second Graduate Student Conference, to be held on the 17thand 18thof June, 2013, as part of the “Argumentation, Communication, and Context” project.

Keynote speakers:

Dr. Hugo Mercier (CNRS Research Scientist, Laboratoire Langage, Cerveau et Cognition, Lyon, France)

Dr. Catherine Moury (Assistant Professor, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal)

Following the title of the conference, we are inviting graduate students from a variety of disciplines to deliver a 30-minute presentation discussing their current research pertaining to reason-giving and deliberation. The aim is to discuss the application of theoretical observations to empirical, or real-world, scenarios and thus highlight the importance of context to the processes of reason-giving and deliberation.

EXTENDED DEADLINE: 15 APRIL 2013

Submission guidelines:Submissions should consist of a 350-500 word abstract and be suitable for BLIND review. Abstracts and author information should be e-mailed as attachments to Michael Baumtrog at iflgraduateconference@gmail.com . Please place the blind abstract in one file and the author(s) contact information in a separate file (.doc(x) or .pdf).

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As many will be aware, two weeks ago the Centre for Research in Reasoning, Argumentation and Rhetoric (CRRAR) hosted a symposium on Mercier and Sperber’s argument-based theory of reasoning at the University of Windsor.  Hugo Mercier himself gave the keynote. The panelists were Ian Hacking, Burkhard Schafer, Mark Aakhus, and Lori Buchanan. The co-chairs were Doug Walton and myself. The event took place over two days. The first day was a public presentation and discussion of the theory. The center of the second day’s events was an open (but moderated) roundtable discussion on the theory in which the speakers, CRRAR fellows, and guests all participated.  Both days saw intense, but very stimulating and rewarding conversations.

Spurred by several requests from abroad, we decided to have the events of the first day recorded so that they could be shared with the entire argumentation studies community. I am pleased to be able to announce that that video is now available.  You can watch it by clicking here. Unfortunately, however, there were technical problems with the camera that resulted in our not having usable video. That said, the audio quality is good and the slides for the keynote presentation are synced so that they can be followed with the talk. The panelists’ responses to the keynote presentations are still included too. They were excellent and are well worth the listening.

Thanks again to all who participated, attended, and in other ways great and small helped to make it a great weekend!

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The Evolution of Argumentation: The Sperber-Mercier Theory

5-6 October 2012

University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada

Keynote Speaker: HUGO MERCIER, University of Neuchâtel

Panelists:

  • Dr. Mark Aakhus, Communications, Rutgers University
  • Dr. Lori Buchanan, Psychology, University of Windsor
  • Dr. Ian Hacking, Philosophy, University Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto; Permanent Chair in the History and Philosophy of Scientific Concepts, Collège de France.
  • Dr. Burkhard Schafer, Computational Legal Theory, School of Law, University of Edinburgh

Chairs:

  • Dr. Douglas Walton, CRRAR & Assumption Chair in Argumentation Studies, University of Windsor
  • Dr. Steve Patterson, Philosophy, Marygrove College, Detroit.

Sponsored by:
THE CENTRE FOR RESEARCH IN REASONING, ARGUMENTATION, AND RHETORIC (CRRAR)

For more information contact: crrar@uwindsor.ca

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Rhetoricians will appreciate the presence of an attentive, if quadrupedal, audience in addition to the speakers.

An interesting phone interview with Hugo Mercier popped up today on Point of Inquiry, the blog for the Center for Inquiry.  The role of the confirmation bias, disagreement, and polarization are covered in this interesting discussion.  There are some very familiar themes here for argumentation theorists. It’s well worth a listen.  The clear and economical discussion of what can be complicated ideas here makes the podcast something potentially useful in advanced classes on reasoning too. The interview is about 40 minutes long. Click on the link below to listen.

Interview with Hugo Mercier

(Note: The file may take a moment to load depending upon your connection speed, so do be patient!)

 

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