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Call for papers
TRUST, ARGUMENTATION AND TECHNOLOGY
Special issue of Argument & Computation
Guest edited by Fabio Paglieri (ISTC-CNR Roma)
Deadline for submission: 15 December 2013

RATIONALE

Trust and argumentation have both been explored extensively, for their own sake as well as in the context of their relevance for technological transformations. More recently, these topics have started to be studied together, with an eye to their numerous and deep interactions. Trust and argumentation converge independently from technology (e.g., trust in speakers often affect our assessment of their arguments), but recent ICT developments have greatly magnified their interplay. (more…)

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Call for Papers

The Second International Workshop on Theory and Applications of Formal Argumentation (TAFA 2013) will be co-located with IJCAI 2013 in Beijing, and builds on the success of TAFA 2011 (co-located with IJCAI 2011). The workshop is inspired by the recent rapid growth of interest in formal models of argumentation and their application in diverse sub-fields and domains of application of Artificial Intelligence. TAFA 2013 aims to further foster uptake of argumentation as a viable AI paradigm with wide ranging application by providing a forum for further development of existing ideas and for the initiation of new and innovative collaborations.

TAFA 2013 therefore encourages submission of papers on formal theoretical models of argumentation and their application in (sub-fields of) AI, and on the evaluation of models of argumentation, both theoretical (in terms of formal properties) and practical (in concretely developed applications). We particularly encourage work on theories and applications developed through inter-disciplinary collaborations. The workshop will also include a demonstration session. (more…)

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Two new lectureship openings for folks with competence in computational approaches to argumentation (broadly construed) have been posted at ARG:Dundee.  They are here and here.  Good luck!

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Call for papers: Topoi conference and special issue
INTENTIONS: PHILOSOPHICAL AND EMPIRICAL ISSUES
Rome, Italy, 29-30 November 2012

We are proud to announce that the first TOPOI CONFERENCE will be held in Rome in November 2012. This will be the first in a series of conferences, to be held every 2 years, sponsored by Topoi: An International Journal of Philosophy. In analogy with the journal format, each conference will focus on a specific theme (topos), and contributions presented to the conference will later appear in an issue of the journal dedicated to the same topic.

INVITED SPEAKERS
Marcel Brass (Ghent)
Cristiano Castelfranchi (Rome)
Elisabeth Pacherie (Paris)
Corrado Sinigaglia (Milan)
Bruno Verbeek (Leiden)

SUBMITTED PAPERS
Submissions of unpublished papers are welcome on any topic relevant to the conference theme (see below). Submitted articles should be in English, not exceed 5.000 words in length (including references), and be prepared for blind reviewing. Only original papers (i.e., not published or submitted for publication elsewhere) will be considered, since the authors of accepted contributions will be invited to submit a revised longer version of their papers for a special issue of Topoi, edited by Markus Schlosser (Leiden) and Fabio Paglieri (Rome).

Submission of papers by e-mail to: Fabio Paglieri (fabio.paglieri@istc.cnr.it)
Accepted file formats: .doc, .rtf., .odp, .pdf
Deadline for submission (full papers): 31 August 2012

RATIONALE AND THEME (more…)

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RAIL is pleased to recommend the Special Issue of Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric on Argument and Computation.

If, for some reason, you’re not yet paying attention to the things that are happening in the computation-based wing of argumentation theory, let me ever-so-humbly suggest that you should be. The excellent work being done in this area integrates not only key insights from mainstream contemporary argumentation theory but key insights from the ever-developing field of non-monotonic logic too.  Well and truly gone are the days when, as applied to logic, ‘formal’ meant ‘classical’.  This is truly exciting stuff.  Those with no background in the overlap between argumentation and computation may wish to begin with Chris Reed and Marcin Kosowy’s excellent introduction.  Following that, I would recommend Doug Walton’s article, “How to Refute an Argument in Artificial Intelligence” and Marcin Lewinsky’s article too as being particularly friendly to those whose background is heavier in argumentation and/or dialectics (per the Walton-Krabbe model) than in computation as next steps.

This issue is special in that it shows the relevance of computational approaches to nearly every branch of argumentation theory. To look at what some would consider extremes, for example, formal logic is represented in Kazimierz Trzęsicki’s excellent treatment of the problem of argument classification, but so is rhetoric in the article by Katarzyna Budzyńska and Magdalena Kacprzak, that represents the latest extension of their work at the time of this writing.

It is timely too. For those who have an interest in the way that argumentation is carried out through the medium of the internet this issue will be very useful indeed. The aforementioned article by Lewinsky covers this ground as does the article by Karolina Stefanowicz.  Those interested in contemporary pragma-dialetctics will also find much to pique their interest here, especially the article by the team of Jacky Visser, Floris Bex, Chris Reed and Bart Garssen.

Though of course the computational wing of argumentation theory is established and thriving in departments all over the world, I think this issue of Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric also shows the variety of good things that are happening in what is becoming the vibrant argumentation theory community of Warsaw. We should all be paying attention.

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