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Poroi vol. 10. no. 1 published

POROI 10.1 contains articles by Celeste Condit, G. Thomas Goodnight, and Joshua Welsh.  They are linked by a thematic concern with how new technologies affect common sense and deliberation. Condit, University of Georgia, suggests that digital communication can become an effective means of deliberation and decision. Welsh, Central Washington University, contrasts Aristotle’s negative attitude toward the effect of new technologies on common sense with the more welcoming attitude of modern rhetorical theorists. Goodnight, University of Southern California, argues that the architectonic rhetorical theories of modernity must give way in the digital era to “polytechtonic” approaches.The issue also contains reports from the 2013 pre-conference of the Association for the Rhetoric of Science and Technology (ARST).  They are about how rhetorical scholars are working with scientists as communication consultants on funded collaborative research projects. These reports are by Caroline Druschke, University of Rhode Island; Jean Goodwin and her collaborators at Iowa State University; Sara Parks, Iowa State University; John Reif, University of Pittsburgh; and Kenny Walker, University of Arizona.  The reports are introduced by Jean Goodwin, Iowa State University.  They are commented on by Jamie L. Vernon, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, and Leah Cecarrelli, University of Washington.

POROI welcomes submissions that bring rhetorical invention and criticism to bear on the production, circulation, and consumption of claims to knowledge in all disciplines, professions, communities, and cultures.

To read articles from the latest issue of Poroi, click here.

The Institute for Argumentation, Linguistics and Semiotics, of the Faculty of Communication Sciences at the Università della Svizzera Italiana is hiring for one position at the Assistant Professor level. Click here for details.

CFP: COMMA 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS, INNOVATIVE APPLICATIONS, DEMONSTRATIONS

5th International Conference on

COMPUTATIONAL MODELS OF ARGUMENT (COMMA 2014)
Pitlochry, Scotland, September 9-12, 2014

comma2014.arg.dundee.ac.uk

AIMS AND SCOPE

Argumentation is an exciting research topic in artificial intelligence, with a broad spectrum of research activities ranging from theory to applications. The International Conference on Computational Models of Argument (COMMA) is a regular forum for presentation and exchange of the latest research results related to computational aspects of argumentation. After the successful editions in Liverpool (2006); Toulouse (2008); Desenzano del Garda (2010); and Vienna (2012); COMMA 2014 will be held in Scotland in September 2014.

TOPICS

Topics include, but are not limited to: Continue Reading »

Call for Papers

The Practice/s of Giving Reasons: a special issue of Topoi

Guest Edited by Chris Campolo and David Godden

 

The re-discovery, in the late 1970’s, of the perspectives on argument as process and practice (added to that of product) occasioned a dramatic re-visioning of the object of study in argumentation. Viewed as a practice of transacting reasons, argumentation became a situated activity, or doing, requiring know-how, rather than a collection of reasons – a thing containing a collection of knowledge-that.

This volume focuses on the normative and epistemic dimensions and consequences of viewing argumentation as the practice/s of transacting (giving and asking for) reasons. We mean to create momentum behind the perspectives focused primarily on the actions and doings which, alongside many related human practices, constitute argumentation. Here we open a space to explore and interrogate the idea that neither argumentation as a whole, nor the many elements into which it may be analyzed, can be adequately understood apart from an account of what it is to give reasons, with all the complexity and fluidity that attends our engagement in any kind of know-how. Rather, the practice/s of transacting reasons is central to the projects of explaining what a reason is, how reasons work, the normativity of reasons, as well as their prescriptivity (or our accountability to them). Continue Reading »

Via M-Phi

Epistemic Logic is a formal approach to modeling knowledge, belief, and other informational attitudes, developed by logicians, philosophers, computer scientists, AI researchers, economists, linguists, and others. Historically, with its origins in philosophy, epistemic logic promised to illuminate traditional issues of epistemology, the theory of knowledge. In recent years, epistemic logic has been making good on that promise, with important new applications not only to individual epistemology, a traditional focus of philosophers for the last two-and-a-half thousand years, but also in social epistemology, the more recent investigation of the social dimensions of knowledge and information flow, as well as interactive epistemology, the study of knowledge and belief in strategic, game-theoretic situations.

Click below for the full text of the CFP:

ELISIEM Workshop – Epistemic Logic for Individual, Social, and Interactive Epistemology.

Via Loriweb:

The call for abstracts for the 3rd Conference on Games, Interaction, Reasoning, Learning & Semantics: Evolution and Cooperation held at Lund, Department of Philosophy and Cognitive Science on April 28-30, 2014, has submission deadline February 7th.

The 3rd Lund Conference on Games, Interaction, Reasoning, Learning and Semantics (GIRLS’14@LUND) welcomes submissions from researchers in philosophy, cognitive science, economics, and linguistics, using agent based models with bounded rationality, models of evolutionary dynamics, and other naturalistic approaches. The primary conference aims are to foster cooperation between these groups and help establish common ground.

Click on the link below for more information:

GIRLS’14@LUND — Call for Abstracts.

Via the RSA, basic information on grant opportunities for women scholars engaged in projects focused on the history of rhetoric, including synopses. Click on the link below for more information:

More Grants, via the Coalition for Women Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition | The Blogora.

 

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