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Mr. Cicero Goes to Washington

Friends in Rhetoric and Classics, this one’s for you.

The saying “Good artists copy, great artists steal.” gets thrown around a lot in a lot of different contexts. Apparently it’s a favorite in Washington as well. Witness the Washington Post on last week’s speech by Senator Ted Cruz, in which the Senator appropriates one of Cicero’s Cataline orations–almost word for word–to inveigh against President Obama.

At least he cites his source?

There’s a really nice breakdown of the original speech’s historical background here at the blog of classicist Charles MacNamara, to whom I owe thanks for the tip (via Twitter) about Cruz’s speech.

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 11 JANUARY 2015

The Practice/s of Giving Reasons: a special issue of Topoi

Guest Edited by Chris Campolo and David Godden

 

The re-discovery, in the late 1970’s, of the perspectives on argument as process and practice (added to that of product) occasioned a dramatic re-visioning of the object of study in argumentation. Viewed as a practice of transacting reasons, argumentation became a situated activity, or doing, requiring know-how, rather than a collection of reasons – a thing containing a collection of knowledge-that.

This volume focuses on the normative and epistemic dimensions and consequences of viewing argumentation as the practice/s of transacting (giving and asking for) reasons. We mean to create momentum behind the perspectives focused primarily on the actions and doings which, alongside many related human practices, constitute argumentation. Here we open a space to explore and interrogate the idea that neither argumentation as a whole, nor the many elements into which it may be analyzed, can be adequately understood apart from an account of what it is to give reasons, with all the complexity and fluidity that attends our engagement in any kind of know-how. Rather, the practice/s of transacting reasons is central to the projects of explaining what a reason is, how reasons work, the normativity of reasons, as well as their prescriptivity (or our accountability to them).

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New Book on Kant and Rhetoric

Scott Stroud has a new book out on Kant and rhetoric. The RSA’s announcement about the volume can be found here: New Book on Kant and Rhetoric | The Blogora.

CFP: CSSR 2015 Conference

The Canadian Society for the Study of Rhetoric (CSSR/SCER) invites members to submit proposals for papers to be presented at its annual conference, to be held in conjunction with the Canadian Federation of Social Sciences and Humanities’ Congress 2015 (a href=”http://congress2015.ca”>http://congress2015.ca) at the University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON., June 3-5, 2015.

Click here to download the full CFP in pdf format.

OSSA Proceedings Digital Archive

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Just in case you’ve not yet heard about this, the folks in Windsor have done us all a great service. The proceedings of all OSSA conferences from the very first to the most recent are now available online at the OSSA Conference Archive. Papers and commentaries are available for viewing and download. Search options are up-to-date too. For those of us who want to cite these papers in our work, this is an indispensable and easy-to-use resource that compares favorably with the ISSA Conference Archive maintained by Rozenberg Quarterly. Both are laudable additions to the online resources available for argumentation researchers.

home_180The latest issue of the journal Cogency is now available! Most articles are open access pdf downloads. Do check it out!

CFP: MET-ARG

The 1st International Workshop for Methodologies for Research on Legal Argumentation (MET-ARG)

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December 10, 2014, Kraków, Poland at JURIX 2014 (The 27th International Conference on Legal Knowledge and Information Systems, http://conference.jurix.nl/2014/)

MET-ARG is held in conjunction with the CMNA 14 workshop (http://www.cmna.info/CMNA14) and is organized under auspices of the ArgDiaP organisation (http://argdiap.pl/)

The aim of the workshop is to provide a space for exchange of methodological ideas concerning the research on legal argumentation from three perspectives: AI and Law, argumentation theory and legal theory. Since a thorough discussion of scientific aims and adopted methodologies is needed in this field, our main motivation is to discuss some perspectives of cooperation and mutual inspiration among these three research areas in order to develop more effective, accurate and scientifically adequate theories and models of legal argumentation. This may lead to establishing of interdisciplinary research projects related to legal argumentation.

Since we intend to facilitate a vivid and fruitful discussion of these issues, we would like to call for participation in the workshop on behalf of the organizing committee.

CONTRIBUTORS

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