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Informal Logic vol. 31 no. 4

Informal Logic vol. 31 no. 4

Informal Logic vol. 34, no. 4 is up at the journal’s homepage.

Contents

Looking forward to reading that first one, myself! Interesting issue overall, though–do check it out!

via Loriweb

The MSc Logic, offered by the the Institute for Logic, Language and Computation (ILLC) at the University of Amsterdam, is a two-year Master’s programme providing intensive interdisciplinary research training for excellent students with a first degree in Mathematics, Computer Science, Philosophy, Linguistics, or a related discipline.

For more information including application deadlines, see the program’s homepage: http://www.illc.uva.nl/MScLogic/

As the title suggests, it’s a wiki for PhD programs in philosophical logic. Nice work here! Tip of the hat to Richard Zach’s blog for posting this, else I might have missed it!

Conference to be held at the University of Edinburgh on 27-28 May, 2015.

This is a conference aimed at graduate students working on topics that fall broadly within the domain of epistemology. The deadline for submissions is 1 March 2015. See the conference page for more details.

Mr. Cicero Goes to Washington

Friends in Rhetoric and Classics, this one’s for you.

The saying “Good artists copy, great artists steal.” gets thrown around a lot in a lot of different contexts. Apparently it’s a favorite in Washington as well. Witness the Washington Post on last week’s speech by Senator Ted Cruz, in which the Senator appropriates one of Cicero’s Cataline orations–almost word for word–to inveigh against President Obama.

At least he cites his source?

There’s a really nice breakdown of the original speech’s historical background here at the blog of classicist Charles MacNamara, to whom I owe thanks for the tip (via Twitter) about Cruz’s speech.

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 11 JANUARY 2015

The Practice/s of Giving Reasons: a special issue of Topoi

Guest Edited by Chris Campolo and David Godden

 

The re-discovery, in the late 1970’s, of the perspectives on argument as process and practice (added to that of product) occasioned a dramatic re-visioning of the object of study in argumentation. Viewed as a practice of transacting reasons, argumentation became a situated activity, or doing, requiring know-how, rather than a collection of reasons – a thing containing a collection of knowledge-that.

This volume focuses on the normative and epistemic dimensions and consequences of viewing argumentation as the practice/s of transacting (giving and asking for) reasons. We mean to create momentum behind the perspectives focused primarily on the actions and doings which, alongside many related human practices, constitute argumentation. Here we open a space to explore and interrogate the idea that neither argumentation as a whole, nor the many elements into which it may be analyzed, can be adequately understood apart from an account of what it is to give reasons, with all the complexity and fluidity that attends our engagement in any kind of know-how. Rather, the practice/s of transacting reasons is central to the projects of explaining what a reason is, how reasons work, the normativity of reasons, as well as their prescriptivity (or our accountability to them).

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New Book on Kant and Rhetoric

Scott Stroud has a new book out on Kant and rhetoric. The RSA’s announcement about the volume can be found here: New Book on Kant and Rhetoric | The Blogora.

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