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Archive for the ‘Rhetoric’ Category

VISUAL – MULTIMODAL ARGUMENTATION & RHETORIC: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS

(provisional title)

Editors: Assimakis Tseronis (University of Amsterdam); Charles Forceville (University of Amsterdam)

Taking up on the momentum that has been gathering in the last two decades around the study of multimodal discourse from an argumentation studies perspective, we have taken the initiative to propose the first edited volume on the subject to the Argumentation in Context book series of John Benjamins Publishing House. The number of papers presented in the last OSSA and ISSA conferences as well as the special issues devoted to the subject by journals such as Argumentation and Advocacy, Argumentation, and Semiotica attest the growing interest and maturing discussions on the theoretical, methodological and analytical issues that the argumentative analysis of non-verbal modes raises. We would like to invite you to submit a proposal for a chapter that fits with the project as described in the outline of the book.

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Friends in Rhetoric and Classics, this one’s for you.

The saying “Good artists copy, great artists steal.” gets thrown around a lot in a lot of different contexts. Apparently it’s a favorite in Washington as well. Witness the Washington Post on last week’s speech by Senator Ted Cruz, in which the Senator appropriates one of Cicero’s Cataline orations–almost word for word–to inveigh against President Obama.

At least he cites his source?

There’s a really nice breakdown of the original speech’s historical background here at the blog of classicist Charles MacNamara, to whom I owe thanks for the tip (via Twitter) about Cruz’s speech.

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Scott Stroud has a new book out on Kant and rhetoric. The RSA’s announcement about the volume can be found here: New Book on Kant and Rhetoric | The Blogora.

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The Canadian Society for the Study of Rhetoric (CSSR/SCER) invites members to submit proposals for papers to be presented at its annual conference, to be held in conjunction with the Canadian Federation of Social Sciences and Humanities’ Congress 2015 (a href=”http://congress2015.ca”>http://congress2015.ca) at the University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON., June 3-5, 2015.

Click here to download the full CFP in pdf format.

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home_180The latest issue of the journal Cogency is now available! Most articles are open access pdf downloads. Do check it out!

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From the Journal homepage:

In Greek mythology, Eris is the goddess of discord, strife, and quarrel. Aesop warned that Eris should be left undisturbed since combating Eris could cause it to intensify. However, Hesiod recognized Eris’s second nature as a force of progress and improvement, the noble competition. Argumentation and debate can regulate Eris and prioritize its second positive nature, sometimes leading to the solution or dissolution of the dispute.

The purpose of Eris is to refine and reflect on theory and practice of argumentation and debate. It seeks to attract and promote theoretical, empirical, and educational contributions on argumentation and debate from several perspectives (philosophical, rhetorical, educational, psychological, among others) with a focus on both their function to regulate conflicts and disagreements and their epistemic function.

Therefore, we invite you to submit paper proposals for the next issues of Eris. Italian, English, French and Spanish papers will be accepted for peer review.

For paper guidelines, please check the website: Eris.

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CALL FOR PANELS/PAPERS

“BUILDING CONSENSUS. RHETORIC BETWEEN DEMOCRACY AND CONFLICT”

Palermo, 15-18th April 2015

The aim of this conference is to encourage an interdisciplinary investigation of the role of rhetoric and discursive processes in the realization of democracy and its eventual degenerations. In the contemporary debate on this topic, there seems to be a polarization between two different conceptions of democracy: the “deliberative” one and the “agonistic” one. The first one is related to the classical tradition that considers Habermas as its reference point. This conception emphasizes the role of rational deliberation as a means to produce a legitimate and binding consensus. Instead, the second one draws its inspiration from C. Schmitt, and considers conflict and disagreement as unavoidable conditions of democratic life. Despite their obvious differences, these two theoretical models have a conception of rhetoric in common that is subjected to, or at least separated from, the full exercise of argumentative rationality. Nevertheless, an interpretation of rhetoric that includes the logical-argumentative dimension in the rhetorical domain is possible. In this way, the recovery of rhetoric, considered both as a practice and as a theory of persuasive speech, may shed light on the role of discursive processes in building consensus, and thus might allow a revision of the dialectical tension between the pairs of concepts that the debate tends to focus on: normative/descriptive, rational/irrational, agreement/conflict. Starting from this theoretical framework, the organizers hope to receive papers with a theoretical or historical character that come from different disciplines and perspectives, including: rhetoric, philosophy of language, philosophy of politics, argumentation theory, sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, and political science.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

  • Luciano Canfora (University of Bari)
  • Chantal Mouffe (University of Westminster)
  • Paolo Virno (Universitày of Roma III)

The conference will be organized by EIKOS. International Research Group on Rhetoric and hosted by The Department of the Humanistic Sciences at the University of Palermo in cooperation with the International Center for Philosophical Research (CRF).

Conference Proceedings will be published in EPEKEINA. International Journal of Ontology. History and Critics, Vol. 7, n. 2/2016.

For more information visit the conference website:

CRF – Centro Internazionale per la Ricerca Filosofica | EIKOS.

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