Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Rationality’ Category

Argumentation, Rationality and Decision

Imperial College London, 18th-19th September 2014

Argumentation, initially studied in philosophy and law, has in recent years been the subject of extensive formal research in artificial intelligence and computer science. It provides representations and algorithms for reasoning with incomplete and possibly inconsistent information. Formalisms can be used to model decision-making by individual agents performing critical thinking or by multiple entities dialectically engaged to reach mutually acceptable decisions. However, so far there has been little engagement with the rich mathematical theories of decision, studied as part of microeconomic theory.

In turn, formal rational choice theory has paid little attention to the structure and content of arguments brought to bear on decisions. The outcomes of choices are typically assigned values treated as embodying a cardinal or ordinal preference relation, with decision rules identifying good choices according to various decision rules and under differing conditions of circumstantial knowledge (certainty, strict uncertainty, risk). However, when people make decisions, whether that process has been rational or not depends not only on the optimality of outcome, but also on the argumentative structure implicit in the person’s deliberation. The structure of argument is important, and arguments for and against choices are weighed against each other depending on how firm the reasons are from which the argument is formed.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

First Call For Papers

JELIA 2014

14th European Conference on Logics in Artificial Intelligence

Madeira Island, Portugal
September 24-26, 2014

http://www.uma.pt/jelia2014

Submission Deadline: May 19 (Abstracts); May 23 (Papers)

About JELIA

Logics have, for many years, laid claim to providing a formal basis for the study and development of applications and systems in Artificial Intelligence. With the depth and maturity of formalisms, methodologies and logic-based systems today, this claim is stronger than ever.

The European Conference on Logics in Artificial Intelligence (or Journées Européennes sur la Logique en Intelligence
Artificielle – JELIA) began back in 1988, as a workshop, in response to the need for a European forum for the discussion of emerging work in this field. Since then, JELIA has been organised biennially, with proceedings published in the Springer-Verlag series Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence. Previous meetings took place in Roscoff, France (1988), Amsterdam, Netherlands (1990), Berlin, Germany (1992), York, UK (1994), Évora, Portugal (1996), Dagstuhl, Germany (1998), Málaga, Spain (2000), Cosenza, Italy (2002), Lisbon, Portugal (2004), Liverpool, UK (2006), Dresden, Germany (2008), Helsinki, Finland (2010) and Toulouse, France
(2012).

The increasing interest in this forum, its international level with growing participation of researchers from outside Europe, and the overall technical quality, have turned JELIA into a major biennial forum for the discussion of logic-based approaches to artificial intelligence.

Aims and Scope

The aim of JELIA 2014 is to bring together active researchers interested in all aspects concerning the use of logics in Artificial Intelligence to discuss current research, results, problems, and applications of both theoretical and practical nature. JELIA strives to foster links and facilitate cross-fertilization of ideas among researchers from various disciplines, among researchers from academia and industry, and between theoreticians and practitioners. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Via Loriweb:

The call for abstracts for the 3rd Conference on Games, Interaction, Reasoning, Learning & Semantics: Evolution and Cooperation held at Lund, Department of Philosophy and Cognitive Science on April 28-30, 2014, has submission deadline February 7th.

The 3rd Lund Conference on Games, Interaction, Reasoning, Learning and Semantics (GIRLS’14@LUND) welcomes submissions from researchers in philosophy, cognitive science, economics, and linguistics, using agent based models with bounded rationality, models of evolutionary dynamics, and other naturalistic approaches. The primary conference aims are to foster cooperation between these groups and help establish common ground.

Click on the link below for more information:

GIRLS’14@LUND — Call for Abstracts.

Read Full Post »

2 SNF doctoral studentships
In linguistics – cognitive sciences – discourse analysis
Applications are invited for two SNF doctoral students (100%). Candidates will be working on their PhD within the SNF research project “Biased Communication: The Cognitive Pragmatics of Fallacies”. The project is closely connected to the activities and doctoral tuition offered by the CRUS doctoral programme ‘Language & Cognition’ based at the University of Fribourg and the Cognitive Sciences Centre based at the University of Neuchâtel, in Switzerland. Both PhDs will be jointly registered at both institutions (co-tutelle).

Profile (more…)

Read Full Post »

EXTENDED CALL

“Reasons and Deliberation in Real-World Contexts”

DATES: JUNE 17TH-18TH 2013

The Instituto de Filosofia da Linguagem (Institute for the Philosophy of Language) at FCSH-Universidade Nova de Lisboa (New University of Lisbon) is proud to announce its second Graduate Student Conference, to be held on the 17thand 18thof June, 2013, as part of the “Argumentation, Communication, and Context” project.

Keynote speakers:

Dr. Hugo Mercier (CNRS Research Scientist, Laboratoire Langage, Cerveau et Cognition, Lyon, France)

Dr. Catherine Moury (Assistant Professor, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal)

Following the title of the conference, we are inviting graduate students from a variety of disciplines to deliver a 30-minute presentation discussing their current research pertaining to reason-giving and deliberation. The aim is to discuss the application of theoretical observations to empirical, or real-world, scenarios and thus highlight the importance of context to the processes of reason-giving and deliberation.

EXTENDED DEADLINE: 15 APRIL 2013

Submission guidelines:Submissions should consist of a 350-500 word abstract and be suitable for BLIND review. Abstracts and author information should be e-mailed as attachments to Michael Baumtrog at iflgraduateconference@gmail.com . Please place the blind abstract in one file and the author(s) contact information in a separate file (.doc(x) or .pdf).

Read Full Post »

Fourth International Workshop on Logic, Rationality and Interaction

Submission deadline: Saturday, June 1 2013

Conference date(s):
Wednesday, October 9 2013 – Saturday, October 12 2013

Center for the Study of Language and Cognition, Zhejiang University

Hangzhou, China

The LORI workshop series aims at bringing together researchers working on a wide variety of logic-related fields concerned with the understanding of rationality and interaction. These include Game Theory and Decision Theory, Philosophy and Epistemology, Linguistics, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence. The series aims at fostering a view of Logic as an interdisciplinary endeavor, and supports the creation of a Chinese community of interdisciplinary researchers.

We invite submissions of contributed papers bearing on any of the broad themes of the LORI workshop series. More specific topics of interest for this edition include but are not limited to: (more…)

Read Full Post »

Frontiers of Rationality
and Decision

Final workshop of a European research network
funded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research

29-31 August 2012
University of Groningen, The Netherlands

INTRODUCTION

Formal models of theoretical rationality have seen major recent changes. The consequences for practical rationality have yet to be worked out. Over the past three years a network of experts has held a series of targeted research meetings to address this question.

In this final meeting, we aim to look ahead in time, and beyond the frontiers of research on formal philosophical approaches to reasoning and decision making. We have five guests: Branden Fitelson, Jeff Helzner, Simon Hutegger, Katya Tentori, and Kevin Zollman. There will also be presentations by many of the network participants listed below.

 

R&D RESEARCH NETWORK

The research network for rationality and decision is led by Jan-Willem Romeijn and Olivier Roy. Members are: Johan van Benthem, Luc Bovens, Richard Bradley, Jacob Chandler, Michael Cozic, Franz Dietrich, Richard Dietz, Igor Douven, Stephan Hartmann, Martin van Hees, Brian Hill, Barteld Kooi, Hannes Leitgeb, Christian List, Eric Pacuit, Jeanne Peijnenburg, Wlodek Rabinowicz, Sonja Smets, Kai Spiekermann, Jan Sprenger, Katie Steele, Annika Wallin, and Jon Williamson.

Over the past years we have extended the network with a number of people: Alexandru Baltag, Seamus Bradley, Mareile Drechsler, Catarina Dutilh-Novaes, Patryk Dziurosz-Serafinowicz, Conrad Heilmann, Ronnie Hermens, Soroush Raffee Rad, and Rory Smead.

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

We invite submissions for a limited number of contributed talks. Please send an anonymized abstract of 1000 words to RatDec2012@rug.nl by April 15. The programme committee consists of the members of the research network. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by May 15 at the latest.

 

SUMMER SCHOOL (more…)

Read Full Post »

The purpose of this international workshop is to bring together researchers who apply formal methods, widely understood, to natural language argumentation in order to provide a reconstruction which can provide the basis for an evaluation.

A related objective is to make the state of the art accessible to audiences who predominantly reconstruct natural language argumentation with more traditional formal or informal tools.

The workshop will be held 20-21 September 2012, following the GAP.8 conference at the University of Konstanz, Germany.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

“PERSONS AND THEIR BRAINS”

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION AND CALL FOR PAPERS:

11-14 July 2012, St Anne’s College, Oxford

Organised by the Ian Ramsey Centre, University of Oxford
www.ianramseycentre.ox.ac.uk

Email: irc.admin@theology.ox.ac.uk

_____________________________________________

BACKGROUND

It is now over 20 years since Churchland’s book Neurophilosophy was published, and in its wake whole disciplines have sprung into being, proudly sporting the prefix ‘neuro-’ by way of attaching themselves to Churchland’s banner. We have entered a new period in which philosophy, among a substantial community of its practitioners, might be seen as the handmaiden of neuroscience, whose role is to remove the obstacles that have been laid in the path of scientific advance by popular prejudice and superstitious ways of thinking. Brain imaging techniques, which enable us to allocate mental functions to precise cortical areas, and in some cases to establish the neural pathways through which information is processed and decisions formed, have cast doubt on the reality of human freedom, have revised the description of reason and its place in human nature, and caused many people to suspect the validity of the old distinctions of kind, which separated person from animal, animal from machine and the free agent from the conditioned organism. In addition, the more we learn about the brain and its functions, the more do people wonder whether our old ways of managing our lives and resolving our conflicts – the ways of moral judgment, legal process and the imparting of virtue – are the best ways, and whether there might be more direct forms of intervention that would take us more speedily, more reliably and perhaps more kindly to the right result. (more…)

Read Full Post »

RAIL is happy to announce the appearance of the latest issue of the journal Cogency!  

Click on the image to the right to view the table of contents for this issue.  The articles named therein make me wish this weren’t final exam season. Among them is an article by Tony Blair on the moral normativity of argumentation, an issue by Scott Aikin on how the rhetorical model of argument is self-defeating, and a note on practical reasoning by Gilbert Harman just to name a few. All the articles aren’t available for download yet but I’m assured that they will be soon. The editorial, which is available for download at the present time, gives a brief synopsis of the articles.  (It also gives a fairly comprehensive listing of recent and ongoing conferences in argumentation theory.) Happy reading!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 90 other followers