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Archive for the ‘Pragma-dialectics’ Category

“Argumentation and language”

The CoRReA (Collectif Romand de Recherches sur l’Argumentation, http://www.collectifcorrea.wordpress.com) is pleased to issue the call for papers for the International Conference ARG-AGE 2015, to be held at the University of Lausanne in 2015 (9-11 September). The languages of the conference will be English and French.

Conference themes:

  1. Linguistic markers
  2. Discursive processes
  3. Cognitive operations

(more…)

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Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric

Vol.36 No. 49

Budzynska Katarzyna, van Eemeren Frans H., Koszowy Marcin, “Preface: From Pragmatics and Dialectics to Argument Studies”

PART I: SPEECH ACTS AND ARGUMENTS

Searle John R., “The Structure and Functions of Language”

Snoeck Henkemans A., Francisca, “Speech Act Theory and the Study of Argumentation”

Andone, Corina, “Maneuvering with the Burden of Proof: Confrontational Strategies in Dealing with Political Accountability”

Goodwin, Jean, “Conceptions of Speech Acts in the Theory and Practice of Argumentation: A Case Study of a Debate about Advocating”

PART II: ARGUMENTATION IN A DIALOGUE

Simons Peter, “Linguistic Complexity and Argumentative Unity: A Lvov-Warsaw School Supplement”

Mackenzie Jim, “From Speech Acts to Semantics”

Jacquette Dale, “Collective Referential Intentionality in the Semantics of Dialogue”

Botting David, “Without Qualification: an Inquiry into the Secundum Quid”

Wells Simon, “Supporting Argumentation Schemes in Argumentative Dialogue Games”

Lewiński Marcin, “Argumentative Polylogues: Beyond Dialectical Understanding of Fallacies”

PART III: DISCUSSION PAPERS

van Laar Jan Albert,”Motivated Doubts: A Comment on Walton’s Theory of Criticism”

Szymanek Krzysztof, “Justification and Argumentation”

Forgács Gábor,”Strategic Manoeuvring and the Selection of Starting Points in the Pragma-Dialectical Framework”

All papers are available as open access, pdf downloads at the Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric homepage

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April 11-13, 2014
Wake Forest University
Winston-Salem, North Carolina

The 15th Biennial Wake Forest University Argumentation Conference will feature keynote addresses by Hans Hansen, Ekaterina Haskins, and Catherine Palczewski, as well as a special workshop with Frans van Eemeren and a workshop for undergraduate students with Gordon Mitchell.

The Biennial Wake Forest Argumentation Conference began in November, 1983, with a one-day conference on the Wake Forest University campus.  After again meeting on the Wake Forest campus in 1985, the Conference was convened in 1987 in the Wake Forest study abroad facility, Casa Artom, in Venice, Italy, with co-sponsorship from the International Society for the Study of Argumentation (ISSA).  The conference has subsequently alternated between “the Venice Conference” and domestic sites.
The 15th Wake Forest University Argumentation Conference will take place concurrent with the 2014 Wake Debate Reunion in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

We invite papers, panel and seminar submissions: (more…)

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5th Biennial RSA Summer Institute
Lawrence, KS
June 3 – 9, 2013

The Institute will commence with five Seminars running from Monday to Friday, June 3-7, culminating in a plenary luncheon. After lunch on the 7th, twenty Workshops begin and will run to midday on Sunday, June 9th.

2013 Institute Schedule of Events


Registration for the 2013 RSA Summer Institute in Lawrence, KS is open! If you have been accepted into a Workshop or a Seminar (or if you are a session leader), it’s time to register. To do so, please visit http://www.continuinged.ku.edu/programs/rhetoric-society/. If you are a session leader or a graduate student, you will need a special code to receive the appropriate discounts. You should have received this code already. If you are not a session leader or a graduate student, you do not need a code to register. The Registration deadline is April 1, 2013.

Related news: Information on Lodging for the Institute can be found here:http://rhetoricsociety.org/aws/RSA/pt/sp/institute_lodging.

Argumentation

Seminar leaders:

David Zarefsky, Northwestern University
Robert C. Rowland, University of Kansas
Jean Goodwin, Iowa State University
Jeanne Fahnestock, University of Maryland
Frans H. van Eemeren, University of Amsterdam

Argumentation is the study of how people justify their acts, beliefs, attitudes, and values, and influence the thought and actions of others, by providing good reasons for the claims they make. This subfield includes both descriptive study (what do people consider to be good reasons and what are they doing when they offer what they take to be justifications?) and normative investigation (under what circumstances should claims be considered justified?). It addressesboth argumentation in general and argumentation in specific contexts such as law, business,science, religion, and public affairs. (more…)

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We all know we’re not supposed to engage in fallacious argumentation.  We might disagree about what fallacies there are or how they work, but we all agree that there are certain moves in argumentation–at least in some contexts–that are just downright, well…dishonest. How do we keep students and others in our charge from wandering down that path? Most of the time the method is to teach and to reinforce practices of good argumentation, while at the same time teaching them how to recognize and nullify, with critique, the fallacious arguments of others. So far the story is not all that different from any other well-known model of moral education. Teach and promote the good, identify and punish the bad.  And that works most of the time in the hermetically sealed environment of the classroom.  Then our students go out into the world and encounter argumentation like this:

Or this… (more…)

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RAIL is pleased to recommend the Special Issue of Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric on Argument and Computation.

If, for some reason, you’re not yet paying attention to the things that are happening in the computation-based wing of argumentation theory, let me ever-so-humbly suggest that you should be. The excellent work being done in this area integrates not only key insights from mainstream contemporary argumentation theory but key insights from the ever-developing field of non-monotonic logic too.  Well and truly gone are the days when, as applied to logic, ‘formal’ meant ‘classical’.  This is truly exciting stuff.  Those with no background in the overlap between argumentation and computation may wish to begin with Chris Reed and Marcin Kosowy’s excellent introduction.  Following that, I would recommend Doug Walton’s article, “How to Refute an Argument in Artificial Intelligence” and Marcin Lewinsky’s article too as being particularly friendly to those whose background is heavier in argumentation and/or dialectics (per the Walton-Krabbe model) than in computation as next steps.

This issue is special in that it shows the relevance of computational approaches to nearly every branch of argumentation theory. To look at what some would consider extremes, for example, formal logic is represented in Kazimierz Trzęsicki’s excellent treatment of the problem of argument classification, but so is rhetoric in the article by Katarzyna Budzyńska and Magdalena Kacprzak, that represents the latest extension of their work at the time of this writing.

It is timely too. For those who have an interest in the way that argumentation is carried out through the medium of the internet this issue will be very useful indeed. The aforementioned article by Lewinsky covers this ground as does the article by Karolina Stefanowicz.  Those interested in contemporary pragma-dialetctics will also find much to pique their interest here, especially the article by the team of Jacky Visser, Floris Bex, Chris Reed and Bart Garssen.

Though of course the computational wing of argumentation theory is established and thriving in departments all over the world, I think this issue of Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric also shows the variety of good things that are happening in what is becoming the vibrant argumentation theory community of Warsaw. We should all be paying attention.

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RAIL is happy to announce the appearance of the latest issue of the journal Cogency!  

Click on the image to the right to view the table of contents for this issue.  The articles named therein make me wish this weren’t final exam season. Among them is an article by Tony Blair on the moral normativity of argumentation, an issue by Scott Aikin on how the rhetorical model of argument is self-defeating, and a note on practical reasoning by Gilbert Harman just to name a few. All the articles aren’t available for download yet but I’m assured that they will be soon. The editorial, which is available for download at the present time, gives a brief synopsis of the articles.  (It also gives a fairly comprehensive listing of recent and ongoing conferences in argumentation theory.) Happy reading!

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