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Archive for the ‘Informal Logic’ Category

WANTED: Ideas for a paper or a panel discussion or a book review session for the AILACT Group Session at the Central Division meeting of the American Philosophical Association, February 18-21, 2015, at the Ballpark Hilton, St. Louis.

This is a great way to share some ideas and test some arguments with friends. It’s always a fun social occasion too.

Topics include:  critical thinking, informal logic, argumentation, their instruction, assessment, and philosophical and psychological foundations.

Please send ideas or questions by September 30 to Kevin Possin: kpossin@winona.edu

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: SPECIAL ISSUE ON TWENTY YEARS OF VISUAL ARGUMENT

Argumentation and Advocacy invites submissions for a special anniversary issue on visual argument titled “Twenty Years of Visual Argument.” The issue, scheduled to be published in 2016, will celebrate and extend the groundbreaking work on visual argument that appeared in the journal’s 1996 (double) issue on visual argument. Since that time, visual argument has become a central topic in argumentation theory and been featured in presented papers and published articles that explore case studies and investigate the possibility of a theory of visual argument. The special issue editors invite articles that outline what argumentation scholars can learn from the last twenty years of work. In particular, we are interested in articles that address theoretical considerations, helping frame a coherent theoretical account of visual argument (and possibly other multi-modal forms of argument). We welcome theoretical contributions that illustrate their point with concrete examples of visual argument and their use. We are committed to having the special issue represent the wide range of scholarly traditions that engage visual argument including, but not limited to, informal logic, philosophy, and rhetoric.

Questions about the special issue may be directed to the guest editors:

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23-26 September, 2015
Diego Portales Univeristy,
Santiago, Chile

Conference Website: http://www.cear-lact.udp.cl/index.htm

About the Conference

The Fourth International Conference on Argumentation, Psychology of Reasoning and Critical Thinking is a new academic effort of our Centre to continue what was started in January 2008 and continued in October 2010 and January 2013. Just as with the three first Conferences, in which we were together with researchers from Argentina, Chile, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, Paraguay, Spain, The Netherlands, United States, and Uruguay, in this fourth Conference we are not only trying to deepen and update the production of knowledge in the fields that this conference covers, but we are also trying to contribute to a positive valuation of different proposals that develop critical thinking and promote social debate with a standard of reasonableness.

This Conference, organized by the Centre for the Study of Argumentation and Reasoning (CEAR) of the Faculty of Psychology at Diego Portales University, would like to generate tools, approaches and solutions to apply in those fields in which the uses of reason is fundamental: communication, law, education, etc. We do not have an official theoretical position, but rather we value the diversity of angles and proposals. We invite the scientific international community, which works in the topics of the Conference, to participate and share its knowledge, experience and current challenges.

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Informal Logic

Vol 34, No 2 (2014)

Table of Contents

Articles

Rhetoric, Dialectic and Logic: The Wild-Goose Chase for an Essential Distinction (152-166), Charlotte Jørgensen

The Authority of Citations and Quotations in Academic Papers (167-191), Begoña Carrascal

Throwing the Baby Out with the Water: From Reasonably Scrutinizing Authorities to Rampant Scepticism About Expertise (192-218), Markus Seidel

Critical Reviews

Meta-argumentation, An Approach to  Logic and Argumentation Theory (219-239), J. Anthony Blair

All articles available online, open access: Informal Logic:  Reasoning and Argumentation in Theory and Practice

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10th eColloq on Argumentation
Monday FEB 24, 2014
4 pm CET (Central European Time, e.g., Rome, Berlin, Stockholm)
 
PROGRAM
4.00-4.10 Connect, Welcome
 
4.10-4:35 Gregor Betz (KIT, Stuttgart, Germany): Is there a method for reconstructing natural language arguments?
4:35-4:50 Discussion
 
4:50-5:00 Break
 
5:00-5:25: Michael Hoffmann (Georgia Tech, GA, USA): Designing argument visualization software as cognitive tools
5:25-5:40 Discussion
 
 
Abstracts are available at the above website.  To participate as a discussant, please register at this site.
Please see the links under “TechThings” to check hard- and software requirements.

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Essay Prize in Informal Logic/Critical Thinking/Argumentation Theory
The Association for Informal Logic and Critical Thinking (AILACT) invites submissions for the 2013 AILACT Essay Prize. This will be the ninth year in which the prize has been offered.

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4th Summer Institute On Argumentation:-

Multi‐Modal Arguments: Making sense of images (and other non‐verbal content) in Argument

May 27-31, 2013 

  • Can works of art, films, virtual realities and other kinds of non-verbal content operate as arguments?
  • Why have some objected to this suggestion? What can we learn from their objections?
  • How can the various theoretical perspectives that make up argumentation theory, such as informal logic, rhetoric, dialectics, dialogue theory, and discourse analysis, account for multi-modal arguments?
  • How can we construct a comprehensive theory of argument that makes room for, explains, and allows us to assess, arguments of this sort?

In conjunction with the tenth OSSA (Ontario Society for the Study of Argument) conference, CRRAR will offer a summer institute on multimodal arguments.

One trend in the development of argumentation theory is an  increasingly broad conception of argument which recognizes (among other things) the use of “multi-modal”  elements – images, music, and other non-verbal components – as key components of many arguments. In this course we consider the questions that this raises. (more…)

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