Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Informal Logic’ Category

Informal Logic

Vol 34, No 2 (2014)

Table of Contents

Articles

Rhetoric, Dialectic and Logic: The Wild-Goose Chase for an Essential Distinction (152-166), Charlotte Jørgensen

The Authority of Citations and Quotations in Academic Papers (167-191), Begoña Carrascal

Throwing the Baby Out with the Water: From Reasonably Scrutinizing Authorities to Rampant Scepticism About Expertise (192-218), Markus Seidel

Critical Reviews

Meta-argumentation, An Approach to  Logic and Argumentation Theory (219-239), J. Anthony Blair

All articles available online, open access: Informal Logic:  Reasoning and Argumentation in Theory and Practice

Read Full Post »

10th eColloq on Argumentation
Monday FEB 24, 2014
4 pm CET (Central European Time, e.g., Rome, Berlin, Stockholm)
 
PROGRAM
4.00-4.10 Connect, Welcome
 
4.10-4:35 Gregor Betz (KIT, Stuttgart, Germany): Is there a method for reconstructing natural language arguments?
4:35-4:50 Discussion
 
4:50-5:00 Break
 
5:00-5:25: Michael Hoffmann (Georgia Tech, GA, USA): Designing argument visualization software as cognitive tools
5:25-5:40 Discussion
 
 
Abstracts are available at the above website.  To participate as a discussant, please register at this site.
Please see the links under “TechThings” to check hard- and software requirements.

Read Full Post »

Essay Prize in Informal Logic/Critical Thinking/Argumentation Theory
The Association for Informal Logic and Critical Thinking (AILACT) invites submissions for the 2013 AILACT Essay Prize. This will be the ninth year in which the prize has been offered.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

4th Summer Institute On Argumentation:-

Multi‐Modal Arguments: Making sense of images (and other non‐verbal content) in Argument

May 27-31, 2013 

  • Can works of art, films, virtual realities and other kinds of non-verbal content operate as arguments?
  • Why have some objected to this suggestion? What can we learn from their objections?
  • How can the various theoretical perspectives that make up argumentation theory, such as informal logic, rhetoric, dialectics, dialogue theory, and discourse analysis, account for multi-modal arguments?
  • How can we construct a comprehensive theory of argument that makes room for, explains, and allows us to assess, arguments of this sort?

In conjunction with the tenth OSSA (Ontario Society for the Study of Argument) conference, CRRAR will offer a summer institute on multimodal arguments.

One trend in the development of argumentation theory is an  increasingly broad conception of argument which recognizes (among other things) the use of “multi-modal”  elements – images, music, and other non-verbal components – as key components of many arguments. In this course we consider the questions that this raises. (more…)

Read Full Post »

CALL for PAPERS

ASSOCIATION for INFORMAL LOGIC and CRITICAL THINKING [AILACT]

AILACT will convene a session of paper presentations and discussion during the APA Eastern Division Meeting in Atlanta, GA during 27-30 December 2012 to meet in the Marriott Atlanta Marquis.

While we are requesting papers that treat a broad range of topics relating to informal logic and critical thinking, as continuing focal points within the modern argumentation movement, we are especially interested this round to invite papers treating themes relating to the teaching and role/s of critical thinking in academia.

In recent months there has been an elevated discussion about the importance of cultivating critical thinking skills in core and general education curricula. These discussions have responded to some skepticism about teaching higher order critical thinking skills, that somehow doing so undermines authority and core social values. In this connection, we are asking for paper submissions treating such topics as (but not limited to) that might be thought to full (loosely) under the rubric of applied epistemology:

  • Successful or unsuccessful pedagogic strategies for teaching CT skills
  • Whether and in what ways CT skills are discipline specific
  • Successful assessment practices and strategies for teaching CT as an institutional or discipline learning goal
  • How student proficiencies with CT skills are measured
  • What students say about their experiences with CT and the means used to gather information
  • How CT skills and information literacy skills are similar or different; on the relationship between CR skills and IL skills in student learning
  • Whether CT skills should be scaffolded throughout the undergraduate curriculum; how CT skills could effectively be scaffolded throughout the undergraduate curriculum
  • Is teaching CT skills subversive?
  • Other

Again, while we encourage persons to submit papers relating to teaching critical thinking, our call for papers is open to any topic within informal logic and critical thinking.

Papers should have a reading time of 25 minutes.

Deadline: 30 September 2012

Send completed paper with abstract as a pdf document attached to an email message to:

George Boger

BOGER@canisius.edu

Department of Philosophy

Canisius College

Buffalo, NY 14208-1098

Read Full Post »

Those acquainted with informal logic and argumentation will no doubt recognize Trudy Govier as one of the pioneers in the field.  RAIL is happy to report that her efforts have been recognized outside of the argumentation community too.  As the title of the post indicates, Prof. Govier has received the 2012 Distinguished Academic Award of the Confederation of Alberta Faculty Association (CAFA).  The full story can be found here.  Well deserved!

 
(Thanks to Cate Hundleby for bringing this to my attention!)

Read Full Post »

Note: As of this posting, RAIL has adopted the convention of posting the author’s name and institutional affiliation at the bottom of each article.

 

What do patterns of abusive argumentation reveal?  Feminists maintain that we receive a disproportionate level of abusive responses to our argumentation, and a disproportionate level of abuse, even relative to the level of anger and hatred on the internet.  Because people are skeptical about the prevalence and level of verbal abuse that feminists receive, and because abusive comments are deleted on many websites, feminist video blogger Anita Sarkeesian AKA “Feminist Frequency” has archived the response to her argument-based request for research support. More details can be found in The New Statesman, and I would add that I (and other feminist instructors) occasionally receive sexist abuse directed at the feminist course content in anonymous comments that are part of our student evaluations of teaching. Anonymity may be a crucial factor in this phenomenon. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 90 other followers