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Archive for the ‘Connections’ Category

Call for Proposals

Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation (OSSA)

Argumentation, Objectivity and Bias

May 18-21, 2016 University of Windsor

The OSSA Organizing Committee invites proposals for papers and posters which deal with argumentation, as it intersects with the ideal of objectivity and the problem of bias.

Abstracts prepared for anonymous refereeing must be submitted electronically no later than SEPTEMBER 7, 2015. Instructions on how to prepare and where to submit abstracts will be made available in March on the OSSA 11 website: www.uwindsor.ca/ossa .

Keynote speakers:

  • Mark Battersby, Critical Inquiry Group Vancouver
  • Scott Jacobs, Department of Communication University of Illinois, Urbana
  • Michel Meyer, Chaire de Rhétorique et d’Argumentation, Université Libre de Bruxelless
  • Susana Nuccetelli, Department of Philosophy St. Cloud State University

The J. Anthony Blair Prize

OSSA wishes to promote the work of graduate students and young scholars in the field of argumentation studies. Thus we strongly encourage submissions from this group. The J. Anthony Blair Prize ($1000 CDN) is awarded to the student paper presented at the Conference judged to be especially worthy of recognition. The competition is open to all students whose proposals are accepted for the Conference. Canadian graduate students who need financial assistance in order to attend should advise the Organizing Committee when they submit their proposals. For the purpose of the Conference, a graduate student is one who has not completed his or her graduate program by September 7, 2015. (Additional information about this prize will also be available on the website.) All conference related inquiries should be sent to ossa@uwindsor.ca

Organizing Committee:


H. V. Hansen – C. E. Hundleby – C. W. Tindale
University of Windsor

www.uwindsor.ca/ossa

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12th International Workshop on Argumentation in Multi-Agent Systems

http://www.csc.liv.ac.uk/~sp/events/argmas15/

CALL FOR PAPERS

Submissions are invited for the 12th International Workshop on Argumentation in Multi-Agent Systems (ArgMAS 2015), to be held in Istanbul as part of AAMAS 2015.

ArgMAS 2015 will focus on the concepts, theories, methodologies, and applications of computational models of argument in creating autonomous agents and multi-agent systems. Argumentation can be abstractly defined as the formal interaction of different arguments for and against some conclusion (eg, a proposition, an action intention, a preference, etc). A single agent may use argumentation techniques to perform individual reasoning, to resolve conflicting evidence, or to decide between conflicting goals. Multiple agents may also use dialectical argumentation in order to identify and reconcile differences between themselves, through interactions such as negotiation, persuasion, and joint deliberation.

The main goal of ArgMAS 2015 will be to bring together the community of researchers working on argumentation in multi-agent systems. The workshop has the following technical goals:

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THE FIFTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON LOGIC, RATIONALITY AND INTERACTION

October 28 – 31, 2015
Department of Philosophy,
National Taiwan University
Taipei, Taiwan

Institute of Philosophy of Mind and Cognition,
National Yang Ming University
Taipei, Taiwan

Conference Website: https://www.yoursaas.cc/websites/36224472513387025486/home.html

The LORI workshop series aims at bringing together researchers working on a wide variety of logic-related fields that concern the understanding of rationality and interaction. These fields include Game Theory and Decision Theory, Philosophy (in particular Epistemology), Linguistics, Computer Science, and Artificial Intelligence. The series aims at fostering a view of Logic as an interdisciplinary endeavor, and supports the creation of an East-Asian community of interdisciplinary researchers.

Topics

We invite submission of contributed papers on any of the broad themes of the LORI workshop series; specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, formal approaches to

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Third International Workshop on Theory and Applications of Formal Argumentation (TAFA 2015)

Submission Deadline: April 27, 2015

http://homepages.abdn.ac.uk/n.oren/pages/TAFA-15/index.html

Call For Papers

The Third International Workshop on Theory and Applications of Formal Argumentation (TAFA 2015) will be co-located with IJCAI 2015 in Buenos Aires, and builds on the success of the previous two iterations of the workshop. The workshop is inspired by the recent rapid growth of interest in formal models of argumentation and their application in diverse sub-fields and domains of application of Artificial Intelligence. TAFA 2015 aims to further foster uptake of argumentation as a viable AI paradigm with wide ranging application by providing a forum for further development of existing ideas and for the initiation of new and innovative collaborations.

TAFA 2015 therefore encourages submission of papers on formal theoretical models of argumentation and their application in (sub-fields of) AI, and on the evaluation of models of argumentation, both theoretical (in terms of formal properties) and practical (in concretely developed applications). We particularly encourage work on theories and applications developed through inter-disciplinary collaborations. The First International Competition on Computational Models of Argumentation (ICCMA) will be co-located with TAFA-15.

The workshop will solicit papers dealing with, but not limited to, the following topics:

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Causal and Probabilistic Reasoning

18-20 June, 2015, Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy

Idea and Motivation

2015 marks the 15th anniversary of the publications of Judea Pearl’s Causality and the second edition of Peter Spirtes, Clark Glymour, and Richard Scheines’ Causality, Prediction, and Search, which together are the foundations for the mathematical theory of causal modeling. During this period, the theory of causal Bayesian networks has been applied to a variety of topics in the special sciences, including the brain and cognitive sciences. This conference will focus on the applications of probabilistic and causal modeling in cognitive science, with an emphasis on assessing both the power and limitations of these tools in our understanding of cognition.
Topics of the conference will include, but are not be limited to:
  • Causal reasoning
  • Probabilistic reasoning
  • Models of bounded rationality
  • Probabilistic causal models in cognitive psychology
  • Models of Judgment and Decision Making
  • Learning and Decision Making
  • Group Decision Making
  • Social Norms and Networks
  • Foundations of Causal Bayesian Networks

Call for Abstracts

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Many of us working in argumentation theory have an interest in disagreement. Indeed, discussion of so-called “deep disagreement” (per Fogelin) is practically a cottage industry in our field. Recently, professional philosophy has circled around to the topic of disagreement too and spawned it’s own cottage industry on the subject: discussion of the epistemology of disagreement.

Though at present neither field is really engaging the other in a serious way, it would be great to see these bodies of research be brought together. (It can be done! As I have mentioned before here on RAIL, Harvey Siegel’s made a good start on the job.)

In the interest of pushing the argumentation research circle on disagreement further towards the philosophical research circle on disagreement, in the hopes of achieving a Venn diagram of research with a healthy intersection between the two, I offer the following in addition to the above link to Harvey’s paper:

First up, via Philosophy TV an interesting philosophical discussion about the epistemology of disagreement between David Christensen (a philosopher I think argumentation theorists should be reading anyway) and David Sorenson:

David Christensen & Roy Sorensen from Philosophy TV on Vimeo.

Secondly, there’s this more recent item of interest from the NewAPPS blog. The piece gives the results of a recent survey of philosophers’ attitudes towards religion. It specifically addresses the question of how philosophers recognize epistemic peers across religious boundaries.

It seems to me that in this (and in other areas) mainstream philosophy and argumentation theory could benefit from making each others’ mutual acquaintance. What do you think?

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VISUAL – MULTIMODAL ARGUMENTATION & RHETORIC: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS

(provisional title)

Editors: Assimakis Tseronis (University of Amsterdam); Charles Forceville (University of Amsterdam)

Taking up on the momentum that has been gathering in the last two decades around the study of multimodal discourse from an argumentation studies perspective, we have taken the initiative to propose the first edited volume on the subject to the Argumentation in Context book series of John Benjamins Publishing House. The number of papers presented in the last OSSA and ISSA conferences as well as the special issues devoted to the subject by journals such as Argumentation and Advocacy, Argumentation, and Semiotica attest the growing interest and maturing discussions on the theoretical, methodological and analytical issues that the argumentative analysis of non-verbal modes raises. We would like to invite you to submit a proposal for a chapter that fits with the project as described in the outline of the book.

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