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Archive for the ‘Connections’ Category

Via Analytic Philosophy

The North American Society for Social Philosophy will host the 31st International Social Philosophy Conference from July 17 – 19, 2014.  The conference will be held at Southern Oregon University in Ashland, Oregon, USA.  Proposals in all areas of social philosophy are welcome, but special attention will be devoted to the theme: Power, Protest, and the Future of Democracy

For more information click on the link below:

Call for Abstracts: Thirty-First International Social Philosophy Conference | Analytic Philosophy.

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Via LogBlog

In 2014, the Department of Philosophy at Carnegie Mellon University will hold a three-week summer school in logic and formal epistemology for promising undergraduates in philosophy, mathematics, computer science, linguistics, economics, and other sciences.The goals are to introduce promising students to cross-disciplinary research early in their careers, and forge lasting links between the various disciplines.

The summer school will be held from Monday, June 2 to Friday, June 20, 2014 on the Carnegie Mellon campus. Tuition and accommodations are free.

For more information click on the link below:

Carnegie Mellon Summer School in Logic and Formal Epistemology | Richard Zach | University of Calgary.

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Via Certain Doubts

The European Epistemology Network provides a platform for cooperation and exchange among epistemologists and those interested in the theory of knowledge in Europe. The 2014 meeting will be organized by the Autonomous University of Madrid. It will be held at Madrid from Monday 30th of June to Wednesday 2nd of July.

Submissions in any area of epistemology (broadly construed) are welcome.

For more information, click on the link below:

European Epistemology Network Meeting 2014 | Madrid, June 30 – July 2, 2014.

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In the last week of August 2014 (25 to 29), the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Groningen will be hosting TWO co-located summer schools with a common theme, Epistemology and Cognition. One of them will focus on contemporary debates on these topics, while the other will adopt a historical perspective. Below is is the lineup of keynote speakers (common to both summer schools) and tutorials for each of them.

For more details click on the link below.

M-Phi: Summer Schools on Epistemology and Cognition in Groningen.

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First Call for Papers

http://argdiap.pl/argdiap2014

ArgDiaP 2014: the 12th ArgDiaP Conference “From Real Data to Argument Mining”

23-24 May 2014, Warsaw, Poland

IGSAR 2014: the 2nd Interdisciplinary Graduate School on Argumentation and Rhetoric “Corpus Analysis in Argument Studies”

21-24 May 2014, Warsaw, Poland

Submissions are invited for the 12th ArgDiaP conference “From Real Data to Argument Mining” to be held in Warsaw, Poland.

The 12th ArgDiaP conference is dedicated to argument mining. We will discuss techniques and methods for analyzing real data in natural arguments which will ultimately help us to automatically recognize and extract argumentative structures. The confirmed invited speakers are:

  • Prof. Fabio Paglieri (Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie della Cognizione — CNR, Rome, Italy)
  • Prof. Andrea Rocci (Istituto di Argumentazione, Linguistica e Semiotica, Universita della Svizzera Italiana, Lugano, Switzerland)
  • Prof. Patrick Saint-Dizier (Institut de Recherches en Informatique de Toulouse — CNRS, France).

Associated with the conference is the 2nd edition of the Interdisciplinary Graduate School on Argumentation and Rhetoric, IGSAR. Students will participate in two days of introductory tutorials (21-22 May) and in the ArgDiaP conference (23-24 May). Thanks to the financial support offered by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education, students may apply for grants to cover a registration fee to participate in four days of IGSAR (accommodation and travel have to be covered by a participant). (more…)

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POROI 10.1 contains articles by Celeste Condit, G. Thomas Goodnight, and Joshua Welsh.  They are linked by a thematic concern with how new technologies affect common sense and deliberation. Condit, University of Georgia, suggests that digital communication can become an effective means of deliberation and decision. Welsh, Central Washington University, contrasts Aristotle’s negative attitude toward the effect of new technologies on common sense with the more welcoming attitude of modern rhetorical theorists. Goodnight, University of Southern California, argues that the architectonic rhetorical theories of modernity must give way in the digital era to “polytechtonic” approaches.The issue also contains reports from the 2013 pre-conference of the Association for the Rhetoric of Science and Technology (ARST).  They are about how rhetorical scholars are working with scientists as communication consultants on funded collaborative research projects. These reports are by Caroline Druschke, University of Rhode Island; Jean Goodwin and her collaborators at Iowa State University; Sara Parks, Iowa State University; John Reif, University of Pittsburgh; and Kenny Walker, University of Arizona.  The reports are introduced by Jean Goodwin, Iowa State University.  They are commented on by Jamie L. Vernon, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, and Leah Cecarrelli, University of Washington.

POROI welcomes submissions that bring rhetorical invention and criticism to bear on the production, circulation, and consumption of claims to knowledge in all disciplines, professions, communities, and cultures.

To read articles from the latest issue of Poroi, click here.

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Call for Papers

The Practice/s of Giving Reasons: a special issue of Topoi

Guest Edited by Chris Campolo and David Godden

 

The re-discovery, in the late 1970’s, of the perspectives on argument as process and practice (added to that of product) occasioned a dramatic re-visioning of the object of study in argumentation. Viewed as a practice of transacting reasons, argumentation became a situated activity, or doing, requiring know-how, rather than a collection of reasons – a thing containing a collection of knowledge-that.

This volume focuses on the normative and epistemic dimensions and consequences of viewing argumentation as the practice/s of transacting (giving and asking for) reasons. We mean to create momentum behind the perspectives focused primarily on the actions and doings which, alongside many related human practices, constitute argumentation. Here we open a space to explore and interrogate the idea that neither argumentation as a whole, nor the many elements into which it may be analyzed, can be adequately understood apart from an account of what it is to give reasons, with all the complexity and fluidity that attends our engagement in any kind of know-how. Rather, the practice/s of transacting reasons is central to the projects of explaining what a reason is, how reasons work, the normativity of reasons, as well as their prescriptivity (or our accountability to them). (more…)

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Via M-Phi

Epistemic Logic is a formal approach to modeling knowledge, belief, and other informational attitudes, developed by logicians, philosophers, computer scientists, AI researchers, economists, linguists, and others. Historically, with its origins in philosophy, epistemic logic promised to illuminate traditional issues of epistemology, the theory of knowledge. In recent years, epistemic logic has been making good on that promise, with important new applications not only to individual epistemology, a traditional focus of philosophers for the last two-and-a-half thousand years, but also in social epistemology, the more recent investigation of the social dimensions of knowledge and information flow, as well as interactive epistemology, the study of knowledge and belief in strategic, game-theoretic situations.

Click below for the full text of the CFP:

ELISIEM Workshop – Epistemic Logic for Individual, Social, and Interactive Epistemology.

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Via Loriweb:

The call for abstracts for the 3rd Conference on Games, Interaction, Reasoning, Learning & Semantics: Evolution and Cooperation held at Lund, Department of Philosophy and Cognitive Science on April 28-30, 2014, has submission deadline February 7th.

The 3rd Lund Conference on Games, Interaction, Reasoning, Learning and Semantics (GIRLS’14@LUND) welcomes submissions from researchers in philosophy, cognitive science, economics, and linguistics, using agent based models with bounded rationality, models of evolutionary dynamics, and other naturalistic approaches. The primary conference aims are to foster cooperation between these groups and help establish common ground.

Click on the link below for more information:

GIRLS’14@LUND — Call for Abstracts.

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Originally posted on Choice & Inference:

Trends in Logic XIV: The Road Less Travelled Off-stream applications of formal methods
Entia et NominA workshop

Ghent University, Belgium, July 8-11, 2014

trendsinlogic2014@gmail.com

Theme

Logicians have devoted considerable e ort to applying formal methods to what are now considered core disciplines of analytic philosophy: philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of language and metaphysics. Researchers in these fields have been accused of sharpening their knives without actually cutting anything of interest to those outside of philosophy. The focus of formal methods is changing and our intent for this conference is to further counter the impression of idleness
with respect to philosophy at large. The focus of the workshop is to be on those applications of formal methods in philosophy which might be of interest to people working on philosophical questions of more direct relevance to human life. We plan three sessions with the following invited speakers:

Session 1 Applications of formal…

View original 626 more words

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