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Causal and Probabilistic Reasoning

18-20 June, 2015, Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy

Idea and Motivation

2015 marks the 15th anniversary of the publications of Judea Pearl’s Causality and the second edition of Peter Spirtes, Clark Glymour, and Richard Scheines’ Causality, Prediction, and Search, which together are the foundations for the mathematical theory of causal modeling. During this period, the theory of causal Bayesian networks has been applied to a variety of topics in the special sciences, including the brain and cognitive sciences. This conference will focus on the applications of probabilistic and causal modeling in cognitive science, with an emphasis on assessing both the power and limitations of these tools in our understanding of cognition.
Topics of the conference will include, but are not be limited to:
  • Causal reasoning
  • Probabilistic reasoning
  • Models of bounded rationality
  • Probabilistic causal models in cognitive psychology
  • Models of Judgment and Decision Making
  • Learning and Decision Making
  • Group Decision Making
  • Social Norms and Networks
  • Foundations of Causal Bayesian Networks

Call for Abstracts

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Many of us working in argumentation theory have an interest in disagreement. Indeed, discussion of so-called “deep disagreement” (per Fogelin) is practically a cottage industry in our field. Recently, professional philosophy has circled around to the topic of disagreement too and spawned it’s own cottage industry on the subject: discussion of the epistemology of disagreement.

Though at present neither field is really engaging the other in a serious way, it would be great to see these bodies of research be brought together. (It can be done! As I have mentioned before here on RAIL, Harvey Siegel’s made a good start on the job.)

In the interest of pushing the argumentation research circle on disagreement further towards the philosophical research circle on disagreement, in the hopes of achieving a Venn diagram of research with a healthy intersection between the two, I offer the following in addition to the above link to Harvey’s paper:

First up, via Philosophy TV an interesting philosophical discussion about the epistemology of disagreement between David Christensen (a philosopher I think argumentation theorists should be reading anyway) and David Sorenson:

David Christensen & Roy Sorensen from Philosophy TV on Vimeo.

Secondly, there’s this more recent item of interest from the NewAPPS blog. The piece gives the results of a recent survey of philosophers’ attitudes towards religion. It specifically addresses the question of how philosophers recognize epistemic peers across religious boundaries.

It seems to me that in this (and in other areas) mainstream philosophy and argumentation theory could benefit from making each others’ mutual acquaintance. What do you think?

VISUAL – MULTIMODAL ARGUMENTATION & RHETORIC: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS

(provisional title)

Editors: Assimakis Tseronis (University of Amsterdam); Charles Forceville (University of Amsterdam)

Taking up on the momentum that has been gathering in the last two decades around the study of multimodal discourse from an argumentation studies perspective, we have taken the initiative to propose the first edited volume on the subject to the Argumentation in Context book series of John Benjamins Publishing House. The number of papers presented in the last OSSA and ISSA conferences as well as the special issues devoted to the subject by journals such as Argumentation and Advocacy, Argumentation, and Semiotica attest the growing interest and maturing discussions on the theoretical, methodological and analytical issues that the argumentative analysis of non-verbal modes raises. We would like to invite you to submit a proposal for a chapter that fits with the project as described in the outline of the book.

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Informal Logic vol. 31 no. 4

Informal Logic vol. 31 no. 4

Informal Logic vol. 34, no. 4 is up at the journal’s homepage.

Contents

Looking forward to reading that first one, myself! Interesting issue overall, though–do check it out!

via Loriweb

The MSc Logic, offered by the the Institute for Logic, Language and Computation (ILLC) at the University of Amsterdam, is a two-year Master’s programme providing intensive interdisciplinary research training for excellent students with a first degree in Mathematics, Computer Science, Philosophy, Linguistics, or a related discipline.

For more information including application deadlines, see the program’s homepage: http://www.illc.uva.nl/MScLogic/

As the title suggests, it’s a wiki for PhD programs in philosophical logic. Nice work here! Tip of the hat to Richard Zach’s blog for posting this, else I might have missed it!

Conference to be held at the University of Edinburgh on 27-28 May, 2015.

This is a conference aimed at graduate students working on topics that fall broadly within the domain of epistemology. The deadline for submissions is 1 March 2015. See the conference page for more details.

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